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UNivERsmr 

PENNSYL\^^NL^ 
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AVOIDING THE THEME PARK: 

A STUDY OF THE ARCHITECTURE OF AUGUSTUS EDISON CONSTANTINE, 

AND THE NEED FOR PRESERVATION POLICY REFORM IN CHARLESTON, 

SOUTH CAROLINA FOR THE TWENTY FIRST CENTURY 



Lissa D'Aquisto Felzer 



A THESIS 
in 

Historic Preservation 



Presented to the Faculties of the University of Pennsylvania in 
Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

2000 




Supfervis^r 

B/bgevW. Moss, Ph D 

Adjunct Professor of Historic Preservation 




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K^\liAA.^ 



;;aduare Group Chair 
Fram^^Matero 
Associate Professor of Historic Preservation 




Reader! 
Robert D Russell, Jr\ Ph D 
Addlestone Professor of 
Architectural History 
College of Charleston, SC 



UNivERsrnf 

OF 
PENNSYLVANti 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



I would like to express my sincere gratitude to my advisor, Roger W Moss, for his 
guidance and assistance in completing this thesis from afar Also many thanks go to 
Robert Russell, my reader and mentor, for going above and beyond on my behalf in this 
project. I am grateful to those who provided assistance in research, and with interviews; 
all of the staff at the South Carolina Historical Society, the Post and Courier Library, and 
the South Carolina History Room at the Charleston County Library, John Tracy Powers, 
Robert Stockton, Jimmy Liollio, Creighton Frampton, John M. Mitchell, A. I. A., John 
McCrady, Jr., and Lucille Von Kolnitz. Special thanks go to Elliott Constantine for 
allowing me to plunder his office, and for all of his assistance, without which this project 
would not have been possible. Of course, thanks to my husband for an endless supply of 
support and patience, and Rebecca for data entry when I was at my wits end. 



Table of Contents 

Acknowledgements ii 

List of Images v 

Introduction 1 

Chapter 1 ; Preservation in Ciiarleston 4 

Chapter 2: Biography 13 

Chapters: Architects Practicing in Charleston, 1940-1959 21 

Chapter 4; Influences on Constantine's Designs 29 

Chapter 5: Constantine's Projects in Charleston, 1940-1959 37 

Conclusion 58 

Bibliography 60 

Appendices: 

A: Maps 66 

B: Comprehensive List of Course Work 71 

C: Ledger 75 

D: Images 140 

E: Sampling of Books from Constantine's Oflfice 149 

Index 152 



List of Images 

Figure 1: Gus Constantine at work with his son, Elliott, c. 1972. Courtesy of Constantine 
and Constantine Architects. 

Chapter 1 

Figure 1.1: Fa9ade Changes to 8 State Street as submitted to the BAR, February 1955. 
McDonald Papers, South Carolina Historical Society. 

Figure 1.2: Revision of Facade changes to 8 State Street as suggested by Albert Simons, 
February 7, 1955. McDonald Papers, South Carolina Historical Society. 

Chapter 3 

Figure 3.1: College of Charleston Gymnasium. Photographed by author, 4/00. 
Figure 3.2: The Dock Street Theatre Photographed by author, 5/98. 

Chapter 4 

Figure 4.1: Balustrade from the J. J. Goodrum House, Atlanta, GA. Dowling, Elizabeth 
Meredith. American Classicist: 77}e Architecture of Philip Trainmell 
Shutze. New York: Rizzoli, 1989, plate 195, page 156. 

Chapter 5 

Figure 5.1: Chase Furniture Company Store, 414 King Street, photographed by author, 
8/99. 

Figure 5.2: St. Philip Street Shops, measured drawings, 1945. Augustus Edison 

Constantine, St. Philip Street Shops, 1945. South Carolina Historical 
Society. 

Figure 5.3: St. Philip Street Shops, current conditions. Photographed by author, 2/00 

Figure 5.4: John P. Botzis Building, 139 Calhoun Street Photographed by author, 2/00 

Figure 5.5: Citizens and Southern National Bank Building, 284 King Street. 
Photographed by author, 2/00. 

Figure 5.6: Citizens and Southern National Bank, interior detail. Photographed by author, 
2/00 



Figure 5.7: The American Theatre, 446 King Street. Photographed by author, 8/99. 

Figure 5.8: The Arcade Theatre and Shops, rendering, 1947. Augustus Edison 

Constantine, Arcade Theatre and Shops, measured drawings 1947 South 
Carolina Historical Society. 

Figure 5.9: The Arcade Theatre and Shops, current conditions Photographed by author, 
8/99. 

Figure 5.10: Ebenezer A. M. E. Church, 44 Nassau Street. Photographed by author, 3/00. 

Figure 5.11: Entrance to the former James Island Elementary School, 1955. 
Photographed by author 2/00. 

Figure 5.12: Courtenay School, Corner of Meeting and Mary Streets. Photograph 
courtesy of Constantine and Constantine Architects, date unknown. 

Figure 5.13: Citadel Alumni House, formerly the Kronsberg Residence, 97 Hagood 
Street. Photographed by author, 3/00. 

Figure 5,14: Hampton Inn, formerly Chicco Apartments, 345 Meeting Street. 
Photographed by author, 8/99. 



Appendix A 

Figure A. 1: Boundaries of the Old and Historic District, 1931. Courtesy of the 
Department of Planning and Urban Development for the City of 
Charleston. 

Figure A. 2: Boundaries of the Old and Historic District, 1966. Courtesy of the 
Department of Planning and Urban Development for the City of 
Charleston. 

Figure A.3: Boundaries of the Old and Historic District, 1974. Courtesy of the 
Department of Planning and Urban Development for the City of 
Charleston. 

Figure A. 4: Boundaries of the Old and Historic District, 1997. Courtesy of the 
Department of Planning and Urban Development for the City of 
Charleston. 



Appendix D 

Figure D.l: Marion Square Bandstand (1944, demolished 3/17/2000) Photographed by 
author, 8/99. 

Figure D.2; Cowperthwaite Building, 209-213 King Street (1946, aUered, date unknown) 
Approved for demolition 3/22/2000. 

Figure D.3: Health, Education, and Welfare Building, Atlanta, GA (1939). Courtesy of 
Constantine and Constantine Architects. Date of photograph unknown 

Figure D.4; J. C. Long Residence, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina (1948). Courtesy of 
Constantine and Constantine Architects. Date of photograph unknown. 

Figure D.5: Condon's Department Store, 431 King Street (1946, 1947, and multiple 

campaigns of additions and alterations, demolished, 1995). Courtesy of 
Constantine and Constantine Architects. Date of photograph unknown. 

Figure D.6; McClennan Banks Memorial Hospital, rendering, Courtenay Drive (1956) 

Courtesy of Constantine and Constantine Architects. Date of photograph 
unknown. 

Figure D.7: Haverty's Furmture Store, 294 King Street (1942). Photographed by author, 
2/2000. 

Figure D.8: Van Smith Building Materials Company, 276 East Bay Street (1949). 
Photographed by author, 3/2000. 

Figure D.9: Martschink Building, 26 Cumberland Street (1944). Photographed by author, 
2/2000. 

Figure D.IO: 307 King Street, date unknown. Photographed by author, 8/99. 

Figure D.l 1: Charleston County Hall, 1000 King Street (1953). Photographed by author, 
3/2000. 

Figure D.12: Marilyn's Shoe Store, 299 King Street (1945). Photographed by author, 
3/2000. 

Figure D.13: McAlister's Mortuary, rendering, 163 Meeting Street (1953). Courtesy of 
Constantine and Constantine Architects. 

Figure D.14: McAlister's Mortuary, 150 Wentworth Street (1956). Courtesy of 

Constantine and Constantine Architects. Date of photograph unknown. 



vu 



Figure D.15: Morris Street Baptist Church, 25-29 Morris Street (1964). Photographed by 
author, 8/99. 



Figure D. 16: Blessed Sacrament Church, U.S. Highway 17 (1950). Photographed by 
author, 3/20. 



Introduction 

According to the chief historian of the preservation movement in America, "It is 
within the power of the legislature to determine that the community should be beautiful 
as well as healthy, spacious as well as clean, well-balanced as well as carefully 
patrolled." The City of Charleston has been fortunate to have such legislators with 
foresight to understand the importance of having a beautiful, healthy, vibrant community 
Because of this foresight an ordinance creating an historic district was passed in 193 1, the 
first in this country, and to this day the physical fabric of the history of Charleston is 
intact like no other city in the United States. As a result, Charleston has led the way for 
other cities to develop similar ordinances. Over time such legislation may have a 
tendency to ossify, leaving the streetscape frozen in time Now as we enter into the 2r' 
Century, Charleston's legislation may need to be reviewed and altereded, just as it was in 
1974, to respond to changing needs. 

Architecture of the mid-20 ' Century is unappreciated and, therefore unprotected 
in Charleston. There are few buildings extant in Charleston that were constructed in the 
popular styles of the 1940s and 50s: Art Deco, Moderne, or the International style 
Augustus Edison Constantine was one architect who dared to create designs in the mid- 
20''' Century that deviated from the lines of traditional Charleston architecture. While 
other architectural firms such as Simons and Lapham, and Halsey and Cummings were 
designing buildings in more Classical modes, and restoring older buildings, Constantine 



Charles B. Hosmer, Jr., Presen'arion Comes of Age: From Williamsburg lo the .\aiional Tnisi, 1 926- 1949 
(Charlottesville: The University Press of Virginia. 1981): 1071. 

1 



was creating more modern buildings reflective of mid-20"' century styles These 
buildings stand out in the streetscape and deserve to be recognized as worthy of 
preservation. 

Charleston's preservation community is beginning to recognize the value of 20^'- 
century architecture, but that recognition is slow and inconsistent In 1987 preservation 
advocates rallied support against the demolition of the Art Deco Riviera Theater (1938). 
They collected 5,000 signatures and presented the petition to the Board of Architectural 
Review (BAR) to save the building." However, the BAR granted approval for another 
Art Deco facade on State Street to be modified to a bland Colonial Revival facade less 
than five years ago. During the writing of this thesis, Constantine's Marion Square 
Bandstand (1944) was demolished; and approval was granted for the demolition of the 
Cowperthwaite Building (1946) at 209-213 King Street? If the City of Charleston were 
to amend its historic preservation ordinance, the recognition of significant 20"'-century 
structures may not be so slow, and fewer of these buildings might be lost. 

Even today there is a battle raging between different factions of the preservation 
community over the design of the College of Charleston's new library planned for the 
corner of Calhoun and Coming Streets. There are those supporters who want new 
buildings to look contemporary, to reflect when they were built. One of their greatest 
fears is if new buildings do not reflect when they were designed, and are created in the 



' Charles Edwin Chase. "Charleston: Guarding Her Customs. Buildings, and Laws." Historic Presen'aiion 

Forum Magazine (YaW 1998). 

^ Approval was granted by the BAR to demolish the Marion Square Bandstand in August 1998 The 

building was demolished on March 17. 2000. Approval for the demolition of the Cowperthwaite Building 

was granted at the BAR hearing of 3/22/00. 

■* Robert Bchre. "Design Philosophies at Odds Over Library," [Charleston] Post and Courier (April 3. 

2000): C-1. 

2 



more traditional modes, the city will turn into a theme park." It is believed that the 
atmosphere of a theme park would be created from a homogeneous streetscape — a 
streetscape frozen in time as may have happened in Sante Fe, New Mexico, and 
Nantucket, Massachusetts, Still there are others in the preservation community that 
believe there is no place in Charleston for contemporary architecture: they think the 
design of the new library should be reflective of historic styles. '' 

Constantine is most well known for his commercial structures on King Street in 
downtown Charleston. However, he was commissioned for many other building types 
throughout Charleston County, the surrounding counties, and out of state; public works, 
churches, schools, warehouses, residences, theaters and office and apartment buildings. 
He also completed additions and alterations to existing structures. 

Constantine obtained far too many commissions throughout the course of his 
career to discuss individually here In the interest of trying to promote awareness and 
appreciation for mid-20 '-century architecture, I have limited the scope of this paper to 
those of Constantine' s buildings which survive in the Old and Historic, or the Old City 
Districts of Charleston, and were designed between 1940 and 1959. These parameters 
undoubtedly leave out many outstanding designs created by Constantine, however it is 
hoped that this will only be the first of many works devoted to the study of his 
architecture. 



Ibid. 
Ibid. 



Chapter 1: Preservation in Charleston 

The City of Charleston established the first historic preservation district in this 
country in 1931. The ordinance has been amended several times over the last 69 years. 
These amendments have served to increase the power and scope of the Board of 
Architectural Review (BAR), and have increased the boundaries of the district from a 
small neighborhood south of Broad Street, to encompass the entire peninsula south of Mt 
Pleasant Street in either the Old and Historic District, or the Old City District.^ The BAR 
itself started out primarily as an advisory board of five members,^ which expanded to a 
seven member board with more regulatory power/* 

The historic preservation ordinance was established in Charleston as a result of 
development pressures felt by the city after World War 1. As Charleston recovered 
economically from the effects of the Depression, and the city became more accessible to 
the outside world with the opening of bridges over the Ashley River (1926)", and the 
Cooper River (1929),'' the character of the city became threatened: increased traffic on 



' The Old and Historic District Ordinance was amended in 1959. 1966. 1975, 1985. 1990. and 1997 

~ City of Charleston Zoning Ordinance, Article 2: Part 6. section 54-231. See Appendix A for maps 

showing boundaries of the Old and Historic District and The Old City District. 

^ Debbi Rlioad. 'The Board of Architectural Review in Charleston, 1931-1993." Presen'ation Progress 

(spring 1993): p. 14. The original five members were each selected from a specific area of expertise in the 

community. One member each came from. The Carolina Art Association, the local chapter of the American 

Institute of Architects, the Charleston Real Estate Exchange, the local chapter of the American Society of 

Civil Engineers, and the City's Planning and Zoning Commission. 

■* City of Charleston Zoning Ordinance. Article 2. Section 54-233 Two members of the Board are 

appointed by the Mayor from the community at large, and the rest are elected b> City Council Of the 

members elected by City Council there must be an architect, an engineer, and a realtor, with two more 

members from the community at large. 

' Sydney Bland, Preserving Charleston 's Past, Shaping its Future (Columbia; University of South Carolina 

Press, 1999): 72. 

' Ibid. 



the streets, the constaiction of gasoline stations and parking lots, and the removal of 
architectural elements from many buildings by collectors 

Charleston has always been a city steeped in tradition After World War 1 the city 
was still being ruled by the same old planter families who were "noncommercial in 
orientation and unalterably opposed to the social changes represented by such forces as 
industrialization."^ They fought for the preservation of Charleston as it was known in its 
so-called golden age, before the Civil War One author, when writing in 1 93 1 about 
Charleston being so well preserved when compared with older northern cities, stated, 
"Charleston suq^asses every other town in the country, as a museum of accumulated 
domestic architecture up to the period [post-Civil War] when we cease to have any 
domestic architecture worth the name "'' Preservation advocates cried out that the 
Charleston landscape must be preserved against "the smoke, the tumult, the deadening 
monotony, the fret of . industrial civilization ""* Another argument was made by the 
preservation advocate, Elizabeth O'Neill Verner, "when America is wearied of too much 
industry, when her fingers are blistered from coupon clipping and her lungs blackened 
with carbon, she can leave her busy marts and come to our city " 

Charleston suffered a multitude of natural disasters in the second half of the 19" 
Century, two of which were a devastating fire in 1861, and a major earthquake in 1886 



' Ibid. A classic example of this is when the Joseph Manigault House was threatened by demolition for the 

construction of an automobile dealership. The house was preserved, but only at the expense of selling a 

portion of the lot to Standard Oil Company for a gasoline filling station 

* John P. Radford. "Social Structure and Urban Form: Charleston. 1860-1880. m Walter J. Frascr and 

Winifred B. Moore. Eds., From the Old South to the New: Essays on the Transitional South (Wcslport. 

Connecticut. 1981): 87 

' "A Cit>- that Lives as a Monument," New York Tunes Magazine (No\eniber 1 . 1 93 1 ): n p Aichiteclurc 

File. Charleston County Librar\'. South Carolina History' Room 

"^ "Letter to the Editor." Charleston News and Courier (December 12. 1933). 

" Elizabeth O'Neill Verner, Prints and Impressions of Charleston (Columbia, South Carolma, 1939) n.p. 



Both of these events destroyed much of the city's antebellum architecture and might help 
to explain this distaste for anything constructed after the Civil War The fire of 1 86 1 
swept across 540 acres of the most densely populated area of the peninsula. The Civil 
War had begun and with fewer men to respond to the fire, which was fijeled by strong 
northeasterly winds, it raged unchecked. It burned a wide path across the peninsula from 
the east end of Hasell Street to the marshes south of Tradd Street and west of Legare 
Street (the area directly outside what would later be designated as the Old and Historic 
District in 1931).'^ The earthquake of 1886 was felt in a greater area of the world than 
any other on record. It shook a 2.5 million square mile area extending as far as northern 
Wisconsin and southern Texas. '^ The greatest damage was felt in Charleston About 
2,000 buildings were severely damaged and more than one hundred were declared unsafe 
and had to be razed. The total property damage was estimated around six million 
dollars.''' Such almost incomprehensible events would defimtely leave a lasting 
impression on Charlestonians who long for quieter, less tragic days prior to the 1860s 
The preference for antebellum architecture prevailed into the late 1950s, and it 
was perpetuated by the BAR itself Albert Simons, prominent Charleston architect, was a 
member of the BAR from its inception until 1975, when he retired '^ He was a 
traditionalist, and the only architect on the Board throughout his entire tenure ^ He was 
a principal in the firm of Simons and Lapham, which mainly devoted hs practice to the 



'^ Jack Leland, "The Holy City Has Burned. Burned, Burned." [Charleston] News and Courier (Fcbruars 4. 

1979): 6-C. 

'^ "Charleston Earthquake, 1886," The Columbia Record Magazine (August 27, 1961). Earthquake File. 

The South Carolina Historv Room. Charleston County Librar\'. 

'^Ibid. 

'^ Debbi Rlioad. "The Board of Architectural Review in Charleston, 1931-1993." Preservation Progress 

(Spring, 1993): p. 18. 



restoration of antebellum residences and plantations in the Charleston area '^ Simons 
could hardly have served as the only architect on the BAR without having a great deal of 
influence on the plans that were approved. When Simons was being interviewed upon 
his retirement from the Board, he was quoted as saying, "The BAR does more than 
accept or reject. It exists also 'to assist, to guide.' That's meant a lot of hours working in 
this office on unacceptable schemes."'^ In February of 1955, an application for work at 
8 State Street was denied Accompanying a letter concerning the denial, Frederick 
McDonald, Chairman of the BAR, enclosed a revision of the elevation stating, "A 
simpler fa?ade is attached as a suggestion," with the stamp of approval from the BAR 
(see figure 1.2 and 1.3).'' In this instance it is clear that the BAR could be a positive 
force for good architectural design. 

Another reference to the preference for antebellum architecture can be found in a 
newspaper article from the Chaiiestou Evening Post (1957): "A lack of prosperity 
immediately after the War Between the States until after the turn of the 20"' Century 
impeded the quality of Charleston architecture for years, as it did throughout the 
Confederate States. "^° It is this lack of appreciation for late 19"'-century structures 
during the first half of this century that is reminiscent of current times when the citizens 



Gardner B. Miller. "Simons leaves BAR "Action' After 43 Years," News and Courier (June 16. 1975) 1- 
B. 

'^ South Carolina Historical Society has many, if not all. of the drawings done by Simons and Lapham. 
The majority of those drawings are restoration of, or alterations to antebellum buildings on the peninsula as 
well as plantations in the Charleston area. This will be discussed in more detail m chapter 5. 
'* Gardner B. Miller, "Simons leaves BAR "Action' After 43 Years," A'evwanfi^CoMner (June 16. 1975) 1- 
B. 

'^ South Carolina Historical Society. McDonald Papers. Letter to Joseph Needle. Citv Engineer. Fcbruan 
8, 1955. 

^° "Architectural Styles Preser\ed." Charlesion Evening Fosi (Februar) 22. 1957). On file at the 
Charleston County Library, South Carolina History Room. Architecture File. 



m - . 1 1 



^50 



■€M>C> i • ' 



|44ij44j^ rlTfrfjjl' .@^§ 



STH i.. ■ M-^3 ■"': 



.^;:.-...ii l-_ 



Figure 1.1 Facade changes as submitted 



of Charleston and the Board of Architectural Review fail to recognize the value of mid 

20^-century architecture. 

Since the inception of Charleston's Board of Architectural Review, the city has 

successfully preserved 18"' 
and 19 '-century structures. 
While these structures are 
important, twentieth-century 
architecture has been 
severely neglected Interest 
in older buildings should not 

preclude efforts to preserve 
significant 20"'-century 
structures, some of which 
will soon be a centui^ old 
A city should be treated as a 
living organism whose 
history is on going. The 
1940s and 50s were 

significant decades in the history of our country, and should be treated as such There is 
very little evidence of this period left in the streetscape of Charleston. The continued loss 
of these 20* -century structures would potentially result in a homogeneous streetscape, 
which would be very detrimental to the city. This tendency toward homogeneity was 
recognized in a 1957 newspaper article, not as necessarily being a detriment, but rather 




' F- K^ <::> CO -1^ ^l_ e.-v'-OvT I 



Figure 1.2 Facade after BAR revisions 



appropriate, "There are examples in the city of departure from the conservative and 
traditional lines of the past," the author writes, "but these are found in only scattered 
instances." The same author continued, "Charleston architects are utilizing new 
techniques and materials available to them, and capitalizing on the lure of the city's 
tremendous architectural history to attempt to achieve well-rounded, yet still conservative 
and traditional products." ^ 

Augustus Edison Constantine is an under-appreciated architect from the mid- 20^' 
Century who was deviating in his designs from traditional lines. Most of his 
commissions were executed in the Moderne, International, and Art Deco styles, while 
continuing to work in the Classical mode. The myopic concentration on preserving 
Charleston's structures from earlier centuries has caused many of Constantine' s buildings 
to fall into a state of ruin, while others are being demolished /" Charleston was a leader 
in the preservation movement in the early part of this century, it has helped set a national 
precedent. Cities throughout the country continue to look to Charleston as a model for 
creating their own historic districts. What sort of example is being put forth by a city that 
fails to recognize significant 20* -century structures? 

The Federal Government adheres to this standard when considering if a property 
is eligible to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places Many other historic 
preservation districts in this country recognize a building or site to be historic if it is 50 
years of age or older. There are even 464 properties listed on the National Register that 
were built after 1950, with 77 of these places reflecting some aspect of our history since 

-' Ibid. 



1974.^'' Charleston's historic preservation ordinance states that a building located in the 
Old City District is not eligible for review by the Board of Architectural Review unless it 
is "at least 100 years old "■^'* While all buildings are subject to review in the Old and 
Historic District, in the Old City District they are only protected from demolition, or 
relocation if they are at least 75 years old, or are rated a category 1, 2, or 3'' on the 
historic inventory maps from 1974 or 1985.^'' 

These restrictions on what is required to be reviewed have left room for damage 
to be done With the exception of a few category 1, 2, or 3 buildings, any building 
constructed in the Old City District after 1925 currently has no protection against 
aUeration, demolition, or relocation. In addition, those buildings that were constructed in 
the last quarter of the 19"' Century or the first quarter of the 20"' Century did not have 
protection until they came of age; as a resuU, many late 19"' and early 20"'-century 
buildings continued to be lost in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s. 

At the very least Charleston should be capable of learning from its past mistakes. 
Until 1975 the Board of Architectural Review only reviewed applications for exterior 



^^ Marion Square Bandstand (1944, demolished 3/17/00 Condon's Department Store (1946) was 

demolished in recent years to make room for a new apartment bmlding The Coppcrthwaitc Building at 

207 King Street was approved for demolition 3/22/00. 

^^ Carol D. Sluill and Beth L Savage. "Trends in Recognizing Places for Significance in the Recent Past."' 

Historic Preservation Forum Magazine (Fall 1995): 44. 

■'' City of Charleston Zoning Ordinance. Article 2; Part 6. section 54-232. Buildings in the Old Cit> 

District are also subject to review by the Board of Architectural Review if they are rated in categories 1. 2. 

or 3 on architectural suneys completed in 1974 and 1985. However the majonty of the buildings in the 

Old City District were rated as categor>' 4. or were not included in the sur\ey. 

'' There are 4 categories total, with category 1 buildings rating the highest as ""exceptional." and category 4 

rating the lowest as "contributory." Category land 2 buildings are considered to be the most \aluable and 

should be preserved //; situ at all costs. 

''' City of Charleston Zoning Ordinance, Part 6: Article 2. section 54-232. The historic inventory maps are 

kept in the City of Charleston's Department of Planning and Urban DcNclopment. Preser\ation Dnisions 

oflRce. 

10 



changes to buildings constmcted prior to 1860.^^ Because of this lack of appreciation of 
buildings constructed after the Civil War, countless Gothic Revival, High Victorian, 
Second Empire, and Renaissance Revival structures were lost to the city In the 1950s, a 
Renaissance Revival building at the corner of King and Calhoun Streets was demolished 
to make way for a 'modern' shopping mall: Marion Square shops." Another building 
lost during this time was a grand Victorian house on Calhoun Street, constructed in the 
late 19''^ Century by well-known contractor, Henry Oliver. This house was demolished to 
make room for Stuhr's Funeral Home, constructed in the Colonial Revival style "■' A 
third building lost in the 1930s was the Gothic Revival style German Artillery Hall on 
Wentworth Street.^" 

If the citizens of Charleston had not been so focused in their beliefs that post Civil 
War architecture was not worth preserving, many more valuable treasures would still be 
extant today. In the 1990s the Board of Architectural Review would think long and hard 
before allowing any modifications to the exterior of any buildings in the southwestern 
area of the peninsula along Broad Street west of Legare, and Logan, New, Council, and 
Savage Streets. Most of these buildings were constructed in the late 19' Century, or 
early 20"" Century, after the great fire of 1861 swept through the area.^' All of these 
buildings had the potential to be demolished, altered, or relocated at any time— until 1974 
when the historic preservation ordinance was amended to provide regulatory control over 



"' Debbi Rlwad. "The Board of Architectural Review in Charleston. 193 1-1993." Presen'ation Progress 

(spring. 1993): p. 15. 

^* Robert Stockton, local histonan, in conversation with author on 2/14/00. 

-'Ibid. 

^° Robert N.S. Wliitelavv and Alice F. Levkoff, A History in Photographs: Charleston Come Hell or High 

Water (Charleston: Alice F. Levkoff and Patti F. Whitelaw, 1974): 67. 

^' Jonathan H, Poston, The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City 's Architecture (Columbia: 

University of South Carolina Press, 1997): 295. 

11 



structures that were at least one hundred years old, or fell into the appropriate category 
assigned to it in the 1974 survey. Even then, the buildings still had to come of age. 
When the architectural survey of the city was done in 1974, not a single late Victorian 
building was given a rating or even mentioned 

The Wilson-Sottile House, an outstanding example of Queen Anne style 
architecture, constructed circa 1891, and located on the campus of the College of 
Charleston, ^ was not mentioned in the survey of 1974, but it was given a rating as a 
category 1 structure in 1985, when another inventory was done " This house has been 
cited as being the best example of Queen Anne style architecture in the city of 
Charleston. It was constructed by a progressive merchant by the name of Samuel Wilson 
before it was sold to the Sottile family in 1912 The influential Sottile family lived in the 
house for 52 years. Despite the grandeur of the house, and the history associated with 
it, the house went unappreciated even in the 1970s. 

Now 20 -century structures suffer the same fate of neglect and demolition 
because BAR legislation does not extend its protective coverage beyond the first quarter 
of the 20'' Century. How many more 20"'-century structures need to be lost before the 
City of Charleston realizes that she is repeating a past mistake of judging too harshly the 
architectural and historic merit of buildings designed in more recent decades'!' Charleston 
should not be forever frozen in the 18"' and 19^' Centuries, but recognize that growth and 
change are a natural and important process in a living city 



^- Ibid, p. 512. 

^^ Surveys (cards and maps) are kept ni the Deparlinent of Planning and Urban Dcvclopnicnl for the City of 

Charleston. 

Jonathan H. Poslon, The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City 's Architecture (Columbia: 
University of South Carolina Press. 1997): 512. 

12 



Chapter 2: Biography 

Augustus Edison Constantine, known by his friends as "Gus" or "Mr. Gus," was 
born in Skopelos, Greece, on September 1 1, 1898. He was the second of four children, 
all of whom are now deceased.' He died in Charleston on November 13, 1976 
Constantine immigrated to Savannah, Georgia, with his family at the age of six where is 
father ran a fruit stand. ^ Constantine spent time at his father's fruit stand, minding the 
store. It is here where he had his first taste of art and architecture He would spend the 
afternoons there copying images from the inside of cigar boxes. He actually designed 
his first constructed building, a storefront in Savannah, Georgia, at the age of fourteen 

Dreaming of becoming an architect, Constantine took correspondence courses in 
architecture through the International Correspondence School based in Scranton, 
Pennsylvania, from 1913 through 1918." Records from the school indicate that he was an 
excellent student; he studied such subjects as Ornamental Brickwork and Terra Cotta, 
Common Brickwork, Rendered Elevations, Geometry, Arithmetic, Fireproofing, 
Specifications, and Intersections, to name a few.*" 



Elliott Constantine, son, in interview with author. 3/27/00. 
' Warren Koon, "Drawing Board Philosopher." Weu-s and Courier. August 19. 1966 Building files at the 
Charleston County Librar>'. 
' Ibid. 

^ Elliott Constantine in conversation with author. Februarv' 7. 2000. 
' South Carolina Historical Society. Augustus Constantine Papers. 1913-1975, 

* South Carolina Historical Society. Augustus Constantine Papers, 1913-1975. Records and textbooks from 
International Correspondence School. See Appendix B for a complete list of subjects studied. 

13 



While continuing to take the correspondence courses, Constantine started working 
as a draftsman at the Atlanta Paper and Pulp Corporation in Savannah, Georgia, in 19167 
From 1917 to 1918, he worked as a draftsman in the Engineering Department of Central 
of Georgia Railway Company in Savannah.^ After Constantine completed the 
correspondence courses he moved to Atlanta and worked part time as a draftsman These 
jobs financed his education at the Georgia School of Technology.' While at Georgia 
Tech, Constantine studied under three professors, all of whom had graduated from the 
University of Pennsylvania with a B S. or M.S. in architecture.'" He graduated from 
Georgia Tech in 1921 with a two-year certificate in architecture" and went to work in the 
Atlanta firm of Hentz, Adler, and Shutze Architects. He worked in this office as a 
draftsman until 1935.'^ 

Constantine had a great deal of respect and admiration for Philip Trammel 
Shutze,'^ who was a famed classical architect.'"* According to Constantine's son, Elliott, 
it is the years that the elder Constantine spent working in the firm of Hentz, Adler, and 
Shutze Architects that perfected his skill and developed his predilection for designing in 
the classical mode. It is interesting to note that while Elliott Constantine and several of 



' Resume on file with Elliott Constantine in the Office of Constantine and Constantine 

' Ibid. 

^ftid. 

'° Catalogue of courses from Georgia Tech, 1921, p. 39; and Correspondence from Yen M. Tang. Archives 

Assistant, Georgia Tech Library and Information Center, December 2, 1999. 

" Catalogue of courses from Georgia Tech, 192 1, p. 40. The two-year certificate was called a "Two-Year 

Special Course [in architecture]." To qualify for acceptance into this program, applicants were required to 

have 1 year's experience in the office of a working architect and 15 [course] units; or 2 years' experience in 

a working architect's office and approval of the faculty. In this program only architectural studies were 

pursued. 

'' Augustus Edison Constantine, Papers, 1913-1975. Resume. 

'^ Elliott Constantine, Interview with author 1/20/00. 

See: Elizabeth Meredith Dowiing's. /twencon Classicisi: The Architecture of Philip Irammell 
Shutze. New York: Rizzoli, 1989. 

14 



Gus Constantine's employees say that he had a preference for Classical architecture, most 
of the elder Constantine's commissions in Charleston were not executed in that style, 
including his own office building. However, typical of the Art Deco style, most of his 
designs do have some modified Classical detailing. Constantine told his son on 
numerous occasions that he did not like what he termed "match box architecture," and 
believed that all designs should include elements of the Orders, or some tbrm of exterior 
ornamentation. 

In the 1940s, modernist styles such as Art Deco and Moderne were popular in 
America. It is quite possible that Constantine was following in the footsteps of his 
mentor, Philip Trammel Shutze. Several of Shutze's buildings executed after 1936 show 
an attempt at the adaptation of classical tradition to modern aesthetics."" He began first 
creating more modern interior spaces, and then employed such features as planar walls 
painted cream or white, simplicity of detailing, and geometric massing in his designs in a 
desire to accommodate current aesthetic interests.^ 

Constantine traveled to France, Italy, and Greece to study architecture in 1930. 
Most of his time in Europe was spent in Greece as evidenced by his collection of 
photographs from the trip.' There is quite an assortment of building photographs. 
Constantine took many pictures of buildings on the Acropolis, with a concentration of 
details of columns, capitals, and porticoes. Constantine also studied modern buildings in 



'^ In conversation with Elliott Constantine, February 2000. 

'^ Elizabeth Meredith Dovvling, American Classicist: The Architecture of Philip Traminell 

Shutze (New York: Rizzoh, 1989); 151. 

" Ibid. 

'* Augustus Edison Constantine, resume. On file with Elliott Constantine at Constantine and Constantine 

Architects. Charleston, SC. 

" South Carolina Historical Society, Constantine papers. Photo Album. (Contains over 450 photographs) 

15 



Athens, such as the University of Athens, whose general facade design can be seen in 
many of his designs in Charleston. Out of a collection of over 450 photographs, there are 
approximately 45 photos from his travels in Italy and only four from France, the rest are 
of Greek architecture. It is also evident that Constantine did some sketching while he 
was traveling abroad. Although no scrapbooks have been found, there is one undated 
chalk drawing of the sphinx sculpture outside a museum in Caulkis, Greece. 

In 1936 Constantine married Irene Botzis (1917-1991) whom he met in Savannah. 
They had three children: Elliott, Peter and Anthony.'^ In the same year as their marriage 
Constantine established his own practice in Atlanta, which he maintained until 1939 
when he and his family relocated to Charleston, S.C. While Constantine was working in 
Atlanta he designed one of the largest commissions of his career— a million dollar office 
building for the State of Georgia (1939). He also worked for the United States 
Government, R. J. Reynolds, and several other clients on smaller projects while in 
Atlanta.^^ Constantine was commissioned by Reynolds to complete a large project, as 
resident architect, on Reynolds' Sapeloe Island (Georgia) plantation, 1935-1936. He 
rehabilitated the 35-room main house and built various out buildings— a power plant, 
machine shops, a barn, and a garage. ^^ One can assume that it was these large projects in 
Georgia that allowed him to obtain so many commissions when he first moved to 
Charleston. 



"° Augustus Edison Constantine, photograph album with list of photographs and Chalk Drawing of a 

Spliinx, undated. The photograph of the sphin.x is # 161. The perspective in the photograph is the same as 

in tlie chalk drawing. 

'' Elliott Constantine in interview with author. 1/20/99. 

"^ South Carolina Historical Societ>. Augustus Constantine Papers. 1913-1975. Partial ledger 

'^ South Carolina Historical Society. Augustus Constantine Papers, 1913-1975. Partial ledger 

16 



Constantine established his practice in Charleston under the name Augustus E. 
Constantine, Architect at 149 Calhoun Street."'^ He generally ran his office with 3-6 
draftsmen ' He did not take on any panners until his son joined the firm in 1969 to form 
Constantine and Constantine .'\rchitects "^ The elder Constantine was well respected by 
his employees. He is remembered as being direct in his speech, and meticulous--in 
appearance, and in his work. It has been said that Constantine was definitely ''the boss in 
the office," One of his friends would tease Constantine regarding his direct nature saying. 
"Gus isn't happy unless he has insuhed at least two people before breakfast "-' 
Constantine was also described as knowledgeable and a good, patient teacher '* John 
Tracy Powers, who worked for Constantine for 22 years said. "Mr. Constantine was the 
best teacher I ever had. Not only did he know what he was talking about, he also knew 
how to teach. "■^^ 

Constantine is said to have had many friends, that he was well liked by all 
Creighton Frampton. retired Supenntendent of Charleston County Schools, was a close 
friend of Gus Constantine.^" Constantine also established friendships with man\ well- 
known, wealthy Charlestonians It is unclear if these relationships were estabhshed 
because they were his clients, or if they became his clients because they were fiiends. 



Augustus Edison Constantine's resume on file witli Elliott Constantine at Constantine and Constanune 
Architects. Charleston. SC. The firm mo\ed from this office to 139 Calhoun Street in 1946. Constantine 
designed tlus building specifically for his office. In a newspaper article written in the local Xews and 
Courier at the time Constantine moved it was said to be tJie first such design in Charleston. S C 

Demeirios Liollo in inten iew with author 1/13/00 

Augustus Edison Constantines resume on file with Ellion Constantine at Constantine and Constantine 
Architects. Charleston. SC. 

Creighton Frampton in an interview with author. 2/8/00. 

John Trac> Powers, employee for 22 years in an inteniew with the author. 1/10/2000; and D. C. LioUio. 
emplo\ee for 5 years, in an inteniew with the author 1/13/2000. 
^' Telephone interview with author. 1/7/2000. 
^° In an lnter\iew with author. 2/8/00 

17 



One such person was Albert Sottile for whom he did a great deal of work The 
Sottile family owned and constructed most, if not all, of the theaters in Charleston They 
also owned three active realty companies.^' Beginning in 1941 the Sottile family appears 
to have hired Constantine exclusively— starting with alterations to their American 
Theatre at 446 King Street He was commissioned frequently to do repairs and 
alterations to all of the theaters on the peninsula. ^- Constantine was also commissioned 
by the realty companies" to design several apartment buildings, a theater west of the 
Ashley River, and to do alterations to their offices.^"* 

Constantine has also been touted by many as being an excellent pubHc speaker " 
While living in Charleston, he was an active member of the community and often gave 
talks on various subjects. In 1944 Constantine spoke at a meeting of the Exchange Club 
on the need for planning Charleston's post-war growth. He was quoted in the newspaper 
as stating, "It is up to the people to see that new buildings are created in a beautiftil and 
enlightened way, so that all who live here will have a bigger and better Charleston. "^'^ 
Five years later he spoke to his fellow members of the Kiwanis Club of Charleston, citing 
14 projects that he deemed absolutely necessary for the well being of the city: new 
schools, slum clearance and new hving units, and a new libran/." Constantine also spoke 



^^ [Charleston] Post and Courier Archives Sottile family file. se\eral articles 

- The American Theatre, Gloria Theatre, Garden Theatre. Arcade Theatre and Shops. Riviera Theatre, 
Ashley Theatre, and the Majestic Theatre. Sec ledger. 
" Theatres Realty, Wentworth Realty Company, and Rosalind Realt> Company. 

See ledger. 

John Tracy Powers, employee for 22 years in an interview with the author, 1/10/2000. and D. C. Liollio 
employee for 5 years, in an inter\'iew \vith the author 1/13/2000. 

[Charieston] Post and Courier Archives, File on Augustus Constantine. No author, "Architect Urges 
Expert Shaping of Post-War Plans." News and Courier, August 17, 1944. n.p. 

[Charleston] Post and Courier Archives, File on Augustus Constantine. No author, "Cooperative and 
Progressive Spirit Called Need of City," News and Courier, Februan,' II. 1949, n.p. 

18 



of problems throughout the city that he beheved would respond to cooperative efforts by 
the citizens of Charleston. ^^ 

Not all talks that Constantine gave in Charleston were related to the built 
environment or the future of the city. He also spoke on social issues such as the state of 
patriotism in this country ' and delinquency prevention in children "^^ It seems that 
Constantine had a reputation for being something of a speaker wherever he went. Friends 
and former employees remember him as being able to talk to anyone, being full of 
humor, and extroverted.'*' Constantine's yearbook of 1921 from the Georgia school of 
Technology describes him as a "bag of conglomerated jabber ""'^ 

While practicing in Charleston, Constantine designed in several styles: Neo- 
classical, Moderne, Art Deco, and the International style. In the early years of his 
practice in Charleston, Constantine worked mainly for the Federal Government designing 
buildings on the Naval Base in Charleston.'*^ Beginning in 1944, however, Constantine 
obtained more private commissions and after WWII designed mostly commercial 
buildings and storefronts, especially along King Street in Charleston This led him to be 
called the "architect of King Street.""*"* Some of the better-known buildings on King 
Street that Constantine designed are the Chase Furniture Company store at 414 King 
Street (1946), the American Theatre at 446 King Street (1946), C & S Bank building at 



39 "'■'^ 

[Charleston] Posl and Courier Archives. File on Augustus Constantine, No author. 'Native of Greece 

Explains the Current State of Patriotism."" .K'ews and Courier. Febniar> 22. 1964. n.p 

[Charleston] Post and Courier Archives. File on Augustus Constantine. No author. "Ways to Prevent 

Delinquency are Cited by Mr. Constantine. S'ews and Courier, January 27. 1955. n p. 
John Tracy Powers, employee for 22 years in an interview with the author. 1/10/200U; and D. C. Liollio. 

employee for 5 years, in an interview with the author 1/13/2000; and Robert Stockton, friend, news reporter 

and, local historian, in an interview with author, 1/12/2000. 

"' Georgia Institute of Technology, Librarv- and Infomiation Center. The Blue Print. 1921. p. 40. 

■"^ South Carolina Historical Society, Augustus Constantine Papers, 1913-1975. Partial ledger. 

"" John Tracy Powers, employee for 22 years. Interview with author, 1/10/2000. 

19 



284 King Street (1948), and the Marion Square Bandstand (1944, demolished 3/17/00). 
Other building types that Constantine designed throughout his career were apartment 
buildings, churches, schools, theaters, residences, and public works "*' In the 1950s, most 
of the firm's commissions came from the various school boards in the area Constantine 
obtained over 75 commissions for new school buildings and additions to existing ones/^^ 

Constantine never became a member of the American Institute of Architects. One 
might speculate that he never became a member because he did not have a baccalaureate 
degree. However, Demetrios Liollio, draftsman in the firm for five years, believes that 
Constantine was unable to become a member of the A l.A due to professional jealousy. 
He believes that other architects were jealous of Constantine's ability to obtain such a 
large number of commissions being a new resident of Charleston and an immigrant "^^ 
Despite not becoming a member of the A. I. A., Constantine still had a busy career in 
architecture. He received well over 900 commissions over the course of his career He 
was registered and practiced in South Carolina, North Carolina, Florida, and Georgia "*^ 
Constantine became semi-retired after his son joined the firm and became its principal 
architect in 1968, but he continued to practice right up to his death in 1976 



South Carolina Historical Society, Augustus Constantine Papers. 1913-1975 Partial ledger 
■"^ See ledger. 

The office of the South Carolina Chapter of the A.I. A., and the national office were not unable to confinn 
any rejections, nor were they able to find out what tlie requirements were for becoming a member prior to 
current requirements, beyond a recommendation from another practicing architect. 
"* In interview with author 1/13/2000. 

"'^ Augustus Edison Constantine's resume on file \\ith Elliott Constantine at Constantine and Constantine 
Architects, Charleston, SC. 

20 



Chapter 3: Charleston Architects, 1940-1959 

Before Constantine's arrival in Charleston in 1940 it appears that there were few, 
if any, Modeme or Art Deco buildings being constructed in the city. Most certainly there 
were no other local firms creating such designs. The general preference of citizens and 
architects alike was for "traditional [buildings] to suit the locality." This is evidenced 
by statements in the newspaper as noted above, and by looking at the work being done by 
such firms as Simons and Lapham, Douglas Ellington, and Halsey & Cummings." 

The firm of Albert Simons (1890-1980)^ and Samuel Lapham (1892-1972/ was 
established in 1920. They practiced until 1942 when both partners returned to the 
military to serve in Word War II."'' After the War the firm was reactivated and continued 
to grow. They took on another principal in 1955, John M. Mitchell (1922- ), changing 
the firm's name to Simons, Lapham and Mitchell.^ According to Mr. Mitchell the firm 
had no preference for any particular style of architecture. He wrote that client's wishes 
and needs, as well as the location of the project were considered when designing a 
building/ 



' Charleston County Library, South Carolina Room. Architects Biography File. "Simons and Lapham 

Return from War Duty to Architecture," [Charleston, South Carolina] News and Courier (January 20, 

1946): n.p. 

■^ Charleston City Directories, Various Publishers and years. 

' "Charleston Architect, Albert Simons Dies," The State (May 25, 1980): 4-H. 

" "Charleston Architect, Samuel Lapham, Dies," The Post ami Courier (October 2, 1972). Genealogy File, 

South Carolina Historical Society. 

^ F. Melendez, "Architects in Profile: Albert Simons, F.A.I. A.," Presen'ation Progress (Vol. 8, No. 2, 

March 1963): 4. 

* Correspondence from John M. Mitchell, A.l.A. on January 24, 2000. On file with author. 

' Ibid. 

21 



However, the majority of commissions the firm obtained, particularly in the 1940s 
and earlier, were to renovate, rehabilitate, or construct residences in the Old and Historic 
District, or well-known plantations in the area. Such examples are alterations to 5 1 East 
Bay Street ( 1 94 1 ), 54 Hasell Street ( 1 94 1 ), Lowndes Grove Plantation ( 1 94 1 ) and 1 4 
Legare Street ( 1 95 1 ).^ They also restored the steeple on St. Michael's Episcopal Church 
after the tornado of 1938."^ 

It seems in the 1 930s and 40s the only place they dared move away from 
"traditional" designs were in the interiors. Two such buildings are the College of 

Charleston Gymnasium 
and the Meminger 
Auditorium. The College 
of Charleston 
Gymnasium, located at 
24 George Street, was 
constructed in 1938.'" 
This building is of the 
Georgian Revival style 
with its colossal engaged columns, symmetry, and formal arrangement. Randolph Hall, 
on the main campus, seems to have influenced the design of the gymnasium. Meminger 
Auditorium, located at 22 Beaufain Street was also constructed circa 1938, in the 




South Carolina Historical Society. Architectural Drawings by Simons and Lapham. 
' "Simons and Lapham Return From War Duty to Architecture," [Charleston] News and Courier (January 
20, 1946). Biography/ Architects file. Post and Courier Archives. 

'" Jonathan H. Poston, The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City 's Architecture (Columbia: 
University of South Carolina Press, 1997): 439. 

22 



Classical Revival style. ' This building was designed with colossal Doric columns, inset 
in a portico. The auditorium is also symmetrical (as it was designed in 1938) and has few 
decorative elements. One historian notes that this design owes something to the work of 
Robert Mills.'" Despite the evidence that they are truly traditional Charleston buildings, 
they are both said to be "more functional" buildings compared to other Simons and 
Lapham designs. Still having the outward appearance of traditional Charleston buildings, 
but with "freer and more modem" interiors.'^ 

Simons and Lapham in collaboration with Douglas Ellington designed the Robert 
Mills Manor Project — low-income housing of thirty- four units, located on Beaufain 
Street. They were constructed between 1939-1940.'^ Even these buildings were 
designed with traditional Charleston architecture in mind. According to one author their 
materials, detailing and scale, along with standing seam metal gable roofs, make them 
reminiscent of Charleston rear dependencies.' The traditional design of the Robert Mills 
Manor contrasts greatly with that of Techwood Homes in Atlanta (dedicated in 1936), the 
first such project in America."' Techwood Homes were designed to have a more modem 
appearance with flat roofs, metal casement windows, and massive rectangular blocks, 
details demanded by the governmental advisors.' '' 



' Jonathan H. Poston, The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide lo the City 's Architecture (Columbia: 
University of South CaroHna Press, 1997): 490. 
'- Ibid. 

' Charleston County Library, South Carohna Room. Architects Biography File. "Simons and Lapham 
Return from War Duty to Architecture," [Charleston, South Carolina] News and Courier (January 20, 
1946): n.p. 

Jonathan H. Poston, The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City 's Architecture (Columbia: 
University of South Carolina Press, 1997): 345. 

'I "'''^- 

'^ Elizabeth Meredith Dowling. American Classicist: The Architecture of Philip Trammel Schutze (New 

York: Rizzoli International Publications, Inc., 1989): 177. 

'^ Ibid. 

23 



In the 1950s Simons, Lapham, and Mitchell became more comfortable with 

contemporary architecture and designed such buildings as the Newspaper Publishing 

Plant and Offices for The News and Courier and The Evening Post (Post and Courier).'^ 

In an address to the National Planning Conference in 1954, Albert Simons stated: 

I believe that properly designed contemporary buildings can be 
assimilated in Charleston provided they are sympathetically studied in 
relation to their surroundings... we cannot go on indefinitely serving up 
warmed over Colonial and expect it to be forever palatable to a constantly 
evolving culture. 

Aside from the low-income housing units, Douglas Ellington (1886-1960),'^ 

Architect, was not involved in many projects in Charleston. Most of his commissions 

were in Asheville, NC, in the Northeast Corridor, and overseas.'" Mr. Ellington 

belonged to many organizations such as the Society tor Preservation of Old Dwellings, 

the Carolina Art Association, the South Carolina Historical Society, and the Philadelphia 

Water Color and Sketch Club, to name a few. He also taught at Drexel Institute, 

Columbia University, and Carnegie Institute of Technology."' Perhaps his most well 

known commission in Charleston was the restoration of the Dock Street Theatre/Old 

Planters' Hotel in 1935, which is located at 135 Church Street." After this project was 

completed, Ellington spent more time in Charleston and was said to be "keenly interested 

in the preservation of the city's architectural heritage."'^ 



Correspondence from John M. Mitchell, A.l.A. on January 24, 2000. On file with author. 
"Douglas Ellington Rites Set Today," f Charleston] News and Courier (August 29, 1960): n.p. On file at 
the [Charleston] Post and Courier Archives. 

;° Ibid. 

"Douglas Ellington Rites Set Today," [Charleston] News and Courier (August 29, 1960); n.p. On file at 
the [Charleston] Post and Courier Archives. 

" Jonathan H. Poston, The Buildings of Charleston; A Guide to the City's Architecture (Columbia: 
University ofSouth Carolina Press, 1997): 180. 
' "Death Claims Noted Architect," [Charleston] Evening Post (August 30, 1960): n.p. On file at the 

24 



Mr. Ellington came to Charleston specifically for this restoration project," which 

was sponsored by the City of 

Charleston as a Works Progress 

Administration project." Again 

he collaborated with Albert 

Simons of Simons and Lapham 

who were responsible for the 

creation the new interior of Dock 

Street Theatre."'' 

One does not really need to 

know what sort of commissions 

Mr. Ellington obtained to 

understand what his stylistic 

preferences were. In 1958 Douglas Ellington wrote a reactionary letter to the editor of 

the [Charleston] News and Courier entitled, "About Architecture."" In this letter he 

declares himself to be vehemently opposed to what he termed "Contemporary 

architecture." He wrote: 

"Contemporary" architecture is not only, as the very term implies, 
impermanent, but is essentially un-American as well as un-Anglo-Saxon. 
Although it has spotted itself throughout our fine streets and centers, as 




'" "Douglas Ellington Rites Set Today," [Charleston] News and Courier (August 29, I960): n.p. On file at 
[Charleston] Post and Courier Archives, 
the [Charleston] Post and Courier Archives. 

Jonathan H. Poston, The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City's Architecture (Columbia: 
University ofSouth Carolina Press, 1997): 180. 
'^ Ibid. 

'' Douglas Ellington, "About Architecture," [Charleston] News and Courier (April 2, 1958): n.p. On file 
at the [Charleston] Post and Courier Archives. 

25 



well as our very alleys, it is still an abortive and cancerous process which 
will inevitably receive the condemnation that it merits, and, if we are to 
maintain, or restore, or develop any solidity of culture whatever, the 
results of this falseness in architecture (by whatever name called)... must 
be torn down."** 

There is little information to be obtained about projects designed by the firm of 
Halsey and Cummings (later to become Cummings and McCrady). Marion Halsey 
(1903-1955) and Cornelius T. Cummings (1913-1967)-*^ both served in World War II, so 
the firm would have been closed during that time, and Mr. Halsey died unexpectedly in 
1955 at the age of 52.''" There are few records left of their work. Mr. Halsey's obituary 
lists the Johnson B. Hagood Stadium to be one of the firm's projects, date unknown. 

Mr. Halsey's daughter, Lucille Von Kolnitz, states that her father designed many 
schools and residences in the early 1 950s. ~ ' She also stated that Mr. Halsey did not have 
much free rein while designing the schools, but that he preferred more traditional 
architecture [as opposed to contemporary] in the residential designs. Mrs. Von Kolnitz 
pointed out that their own residence at 1 09 South Battery Avenue, designed by her father 
and completed in 1954, was almost an exact replica of a house in Williamsburg, Virginia. 

John McCrady, Jr. (1921- ), engineer, joined the firm in 1957."'" He is unable to 
recall specific projects, but states that most of their commissions came from the military 
and school boards throughout the state."' When asked about the firm's thoughts on 
modem architecture, Mr. McCrady stated, "We didn't like it, but we did it." He describes 



'' Ibid. 

"C. T. Cummings Dies Unexpectedly," [Charleston] News and Courier {May 12, 1967). Biography File, 
The South Carolina History Room, Charleston County Library. 

"M. B. Halsey, Architect Dies. Funeral Today," [Charleston] News and Courier (November 16, 1955): 
n.p. On file at the [Charleston] Post and Courier Archives. 
' Lucille Von Kolnitz in conversation with author 2/16/99. 
" John McCrady, Jr., in conversation with author. 
' Ibid. 

26 



the school buildings to be "bland," as they were designed to be of the least expense. '^'^ 

Halsey and Cummings also did some interior and exterior alterations to existing 
structures. In 1949, Gainey's Super Rexall Drug Store at the southwest comer of King 
and Calhoun Streets was completely remodeled by the firm." All of the appliances, as 
well as the ceiling and floor tiles were replaced on the interior. A rear addition was 
added, and major exterior alterations were undertaken. ^^ The 19"^-century cast iron 
storefront was replaced by a large plate glass and aluminum storefront. In addition, any 
elements that identified the structure as Victorian were removed (such as a bracketed 
cornice).' The advertisement announcing the opening of the newly remodeled store 
touts it as the "New, modem Gainey's ..." The store was also awarded a certificate from 
the Charleston Chamber of Commerce for its contributions toward the beautification of 
King Street.^^ 

By examining these few examples of commissions obtained by other firms in 
Charleston during the time that Constantine was designing Art Deco and Modeme 
structures, it becomes more obvious that Constantine's designs really do stand out in the 
streetscape. While Constantine was designing the same basic types of buildings as 
Cummings and McCrady, and Simons and Lapham, such as school and military projects, 
he did manage to leave his mark on the city. Not one other architect's designs can be so 
readily distinguished in the streetscape as can Constantine's. With a few exceptions, the 



"" "Formal Opening Today for New Gainey Drug Store," [Charleston] News cm Courier (September 15, 

1949): n.p. 

J^ Ibid. 

■ Comparing the photos of the store with a photograph from 1 945 that appeared in an article entitled, "The 

World Enters a New Era of Peace Today," The Charleston Evening Post (August 15, 1945): n.p. 

" "Formal Opening Today for New Gainey Drug Store," [Charleston] News an Courier (September 1 5, 

1949): n.p. 

27 



work of other firms during that time seemed successful in blending in with the rest of the 
architecture in Charleston without making a statement, and without reflecting the decades 
in which they were designed. 



28 



Chapter 4: Influences on Constantine's Designs 

When considering what influenced Constantine's architectural designs throughout 
his career, the most obvious places to look would be his education and early employers. 
Constantine does not appear to have taken many classes in architectural history. The 
correspondence courses he completed in 1919 covered only technical subjects.' The 
closest he would have gotten to a formal study of architectural styles was the architectural 
freehand and perspective drawing sections. In these sections the student was given 
certain assignments related to architectural drawing and rendering; the models were the 
Parthenon and residential housing in late 1 9' -century styles, such as Shingle, Queen 
Anne, and Stick styles (none specifically named as such). Other subjects chosen for 
assignments were the Orders." Nowhere in this section were particular styles or time 
periods emphasized, or stated in any way. 

When Constantine attended Georgia Tech (1920-1921), he enrolled in the two- 
year certificate program; and during these years Constantine received his formal training 
in art and architectural history. The 1920-21 catalogue from Georgia Tech outlines the 
requirements to earn the certificate. All of the classes were directly related to 
architecture; only five out of 39 classes were devoted to art or architectural history. All 



See comprehensive list of courses in Appendix B. 
* The International Library of Technoloogy, A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in Engineering 
Professions, Trades, and Vocational Occupations or for Those Who Desire Information Concerning Them: 
Geometrical, Ornamental, Architectural, Freehand, and Perspective Drawing (Scranton: International 
Textbook Company, 1922): 5:87-5:92 

29 



five of these classes concentrated on classical or "important historic styles."^ Given this 
information, it is safe to assume that Constantine's formal architectural training 
encouraged a preference for designing in the classical mode that his co-workers and 
family state he possessed. His student drawings that survive from that time are of 
buildings that are classically inspired, or in the Neo-Classical and Georgian styles. There 
is an ink drawing of a bank (1920), and a watercolor of a church (1921), both of which 
have similar characteristics: full entablatures with low-pitched pediments, one supported 
by colossal columns. Both of these designs are symmetrical. The church was designed 
with quoins and an elliptical fan light over double doors.'* 

After Constantine graduated from the Georgia School of Technology, he began to 
work as a draftsman in the firm of Adler and Shutze (formerly Adler, Hentz and Reid) in 
Atlanta.' As previously mentioned, Philip Trammel Shutze was a well-known classical 
architect whom Constantine, according to his family, greatly admired. Shutze had also 
studied at Georgia Tech, as well as Columbia University, earning two Bachelor of 
Science degrees in Architecture.^ In 1915 Shutze entered a competition for the Rome 
Prize, which was considered the finest architectural award in an era of numerous 
significant student prizes. It entitled a student to three years of study and travel in Italy, 



" Catalogue of courses at The Georgia Institute of Technology, 1920-21, p. 40-51. These classes are 
entitled: "History of Architecture Anceint;" "History of Architecture, Mediaeval;" "History of Architecture, 
Modem (Devoted to a consideration of Renaissance and Modem Architecture beginning with the work of 
Brunelleschi.);" "Historic Omament;" and "History of Art (paying special attention to ...Italian 
Renaissance.)." 

South Carolina Historical Society, Augustus Edison Constantine, Student drawings, 1920-2 1 . 

Augustus Edison Constantine's Resume. On file in the office of Constantine and Constantine, Charleston, 
SC. 

Elizabeth Meredith DowUng. American Classicist: The Architecture of Philip Trammell 
Shutze (New York: Rizzoli, 1989): 4. 

30 



through the American Academy in Rome/ (The closest rival to that program was the 
Paris Prize at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, valued at $2500.00, or two and a half years of 
study.) Shutze won the competition and left for Rome in the fall of 1915.** He stayed in 
Europe for a total of five years, as he served in the American Red Cross during World 
War I.*^ 

The American Academy in Rome was established after the Chicago World's Fair 
of 1893. Charles FoUen McKim, of McKim, Meade, and White was the mastermind 
behind the plan, and principal founder of the Academy.'" McKim realized that there was 
a need for an American school in Europe that emphasized the principles of collaboration 
between architects, builders, painters, sculptors, and landscape architects, within the 
classical manner as he had seen at the Chicago Fair." 

McKim had studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris for three years, but he 
was not entirely happy there; because of his Quaker background he did not like French 
manners, nor did he share French tastes.'" The course of study originally proposed at the 
Academy was, "to occupy their [students'] time in close contact with the examples of 
Greece and Rome, and the early Renaissance."'" McKim had determined that Rome was 
the true center of civilization after he traveled in England and the Continent. He 



' Ibid., p. 9. 
' Ibid. 
' Ibid. 

Lucia Valentine, and Alan Valentine, The American Academy in Rome. (Charlottesville, 
University of Virginia Press, 1973): I. 
" Ibid., p. 2. 
'-Ibid., p. 3. 
" Ibid., p. 7. 



31 



described Rome as being a "great reservoir of past culture, a good place to study man's 
classical heritage."' 

Because Philip Trammel Shutze was so heavily engrossed in the study of 
Renaissance and Classical architecture, it is reasonable to assume that this influence 
would be transmitted to those who worked with him, especially in the early and 
impressionable years of their careers. Augustus Constantine worked as a draftsman 
under the tutelage of Adler and Shutze for fourteen years after he graduated from Georgia 

Tech. Classical styles, or historical 
precedent, were emphasized heavily in 
most American architectural programs, 
following the Parisian Beaux-Arts 
system of education during the first 
part of the 20' Century. The same was 
true of Georgia Tech while 
Constantine was a student there. With 
these two great influences being 
present it is not a great surprise that 
Constantine should have developed a 
predilection for Classical architecture. 
Certain details and work habits continue to be seen throughout Constantine's 
career that reflect the influence of having worked for Adler and Shutze for so long. 
Unlike Shutze, Constantine was more accepting of modem styles of architecture. Shutze 




Figure 4. 1 J.J. Goodrum House 
Balustrade 



"Ibid., p. 3. 



32 



found modernism to be too severe to be introduced into his designs, except for certain 
types of interior spaces. " In the J. J. Goodrum house (1929) in Atlanta the balustrade in 
the entry hall is decidedly modem (See figure 4. 1 ). '*" A slight modification of this design 
is found in several of Constantine's designs. He employed this design for exterior 
balustrades for an unexecuted plan for a residence (1940) for him and his family in 
Charleston. The same balustrade can be found as part of the designs for interior 
alterations for Legerton and Company (1944), and the Citadel Alumni House at 97 
Hagood Street among many others.'** 

Constantine also developed work habits that may have been a result of his 
employment with the Atlanta firm. He kept a large architectural library in his office in 
Charleston. This was a concept introduced to Shutze by Hentz and Reid when he began 
his employment with the firm.''' At the time of Shutze's death his collection of 
architectural literature contained 1,756 items. "° Constantine also kept a large collection 
of books in his office. The entirety of his collection is unknown at this time, but 
photographs of the interior of his office at 139 Calhoun show three large built-in 
bookshelves filled with books, and his co-workers all say that he was well read."' 



' Elizabeth Meredith DowUng. American Classicist: The Architecture of Philip Trammell 
Shutze (New York: Rizzoli, 1989): 172. 
"•Ibid., p. 156-7. 

South Carolina Historical Society, Augustus Edison Constantine. Residence at 5''' and Margaret Street 
(Charleston, South Carolina). 

" Legerton and Company, 263 King Street, interior and exterior alterations, 1944. Also found in the 
Bazakas House (1949). On file in the offices of Constantine and Constantine Architects, Charleston, South 
Carolina. 

Elizabeth Meredith Dowling, American Classicist: The Architecture of Philip Trammell 
Shutze (New York: Rizzoli, 1989): 37. 
J^Ibid. 

Books are in storage and inaccessible at this time. However, a small selection of Constantine's books 
remain in the office of Constantme and Constantine Architects. See Appendix E for a list. 

33 



Another work habit that Constantine's friends and co-workers often mention was 
his attention to detail. John Tracy Powers says that Constantine looked at every detail of 
every drawing and demanded that the drawings be perfect. He also says that Constantine 
made frequent site visits. If he did not like the workmanship, he would make the builders 
tear it down and start over again." In designing interior spaces, particularly residential, 
Constantine would frequently design fireplace mantels and surrounds, cornice profiles, 
and built-in cabinets and bookshelves. In commercial structures he usually designed a 
unique pattern in a terrazzo floor at the entrance of the building and on the ground floor. 
Quite often, Constantine would create a landscape design for the premises that would 
include a brick or stucco wall with an intricate wrought iron gate of his own design.^^ 

According to Elizabeth Meredith Dowling, Shutze was also very much a 
perfectionist who paid great attention to detail. He would often create a landscape design 
with his commissions, as well as many of the interior details."^'* Constantine did not 
create the same types of elaborate interiors or landscapes that Shutze did, but at the same 
time, he did not have the Shutze's wealthy Atlanta clients. There is no doubt however, 
that the practices of Philip Trammel Shutze in his great attention to detail in his designs, 
did impact the way Constantine executed his plans. 

Intricate and unique designs of wrought iron are incorporated throughout 
Constantine's work, in gates, balustrades, and balconies. In 1952, he was even 
commissioned by Albert Sottile to create wrought iron railings in four theaters and a 



Interview with author, 1/10/2000. 
'" Constantine's designs for additions and modifications to his own house at 201 Grove Street demonstrate 
this point well; he designed all of the listed elements except for a fireplace mantel and surround. Building 
plans are on file with the South Carolina Historical Society. 

Elizabeth Meredith Dowling, American Classicist: The Architecture of Philip Trammell 
Shutze (New York: Rizzoli, 1989): 36. 

34 



restaurant in the Old and Historic District.'" This keen interest in creating these designs 
may have come from the hitemational Correspondence School. One of the courses of 
study was Ornamental Metal Work.'*' Elements from the wrought iron railing designed 
for the orchestra pit at the Gloria Theatre (1952)"^ derive from examples provided in the 
textbook."* 

Since there is no evidence of what (or who) inspired Constantine's more modem 
designs, it might be difficult to understand why he created them at all. The fact that 
Constantine did turn more toward the designs of Modeme and Art Deco architecture in 
the 1940s was probably a natural progression of the times. The two styles of Art Deco 
and Modeme architecture emerged in the 1920s and 30s. "'* These designs are 
representative of a desire to seek out new forms, or modifications of old forms, to express 
the continually changing character and accelerated tempo of the new age.^'^ While there 
were other architectural styles emerging — Constmctivism, Expressionism, Futurism, and 
the Intemational style — it was the Art Deco and Modeme that caught the attention of 
most Americans and permeated their lives on every level. ' The influences of the two 
styles affected almost every facet of the design world from hair styles and clothing, to 



Augustus Edison Constantine, Ironwork, 1952. Historical Society of South Carolina. 

Intemational Library of Technology. A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in Engineering 
Professions. Trades, and Vocational Occupations or for Those Who Desire Information Concerning Them: 
Fireproofmg of Buildings: Stair Building: Ornamental Metal Work: Builders' Hardware: Roofing: Sheet- 
Metal Work: Mill Design. Scranton: Intemational Textbook Company. 1922. 

South Carolina Historical Society, Augustus Edison Constantine, Gloria Theatre, 1952. 

Intemational Library of Technology. A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in Engineering 
Professions. Trades, and Vocational Occupations or for Those Who Desire Information Concerning Them: 
Fireproofmg of Buildings: Stair Building: Ornamental Metal Work: Builders' Hardware: Roofing: Sheet- 
Metal Work: Mill Design (Scranton: Intemational Textbook Company, 1922): p. 48: 70. 

David Gebhard, The National Trust Guide to Art Deco in America (New York: Preservation Press, 1996): 
4. 

'"ibid., p. 1, 
" Ibid. 

35 



American films, to furniture, and finally to architecture/'' Given the immense popularity 
of the two styles, it should not be surprising that Constantine would have turned his 
attention to these new designs--and began creating them himself 



Ibid. 



36 



Chapter 5: Projects in Charleston, South Carolina (1940-1959) 

Throughout his career, Constantine obtained well over nine hundred 
commissions. The size of the commissions varied from large federal and state-funded 
projects, to smaller private commissions, to the creation of wrought iron railings. It is 
these smaller commissions from private clients in the decades of the 1940s and 50s that 
provide an over-all sense of Constantine's architectural designs. As previously 
mentioned, Constantine completed designs for a wide variety of building types: 
residential, including single-family dwellings and apartments, commercial structures, 
religious institutions, schools, warehouses, theaters, public works, hospitals, and comfort 
stations. Within these building types, he designed new structures as well as additions, 
alterations, and rehabilitation of existing structures. 

When studying the stylistic traits of Constantine's buildings it is easy to see the 
influences of then current trends in architecture. In the 1940s and 50s, most of his 
commercial structures were designed in the Art Deco and Modeme modes with 
influences from the International style. 

Art Deco architecture is characterized by an emphasis in verticality, which is 
often manifested by rows of abstract columns or piers meant to subtly represent a 
classical portico." The facades of buildings are often arranged in a series of setbacks. 
Strips of windows with decorated spandrels sometimes add to the vertical feeling of the 



See ledger in Appendix C for a comprehensive list of Constantine's commissions. 
' David Gebhard, The National Trust Guide to Art Deco in America (New York: Preservation Press, 1996): 
6. 

37 



composition. Straight edge metal sash or casement windows are most commonly used in 
an Art Deco facade, but an occasional circular or round-headed window can be found. "^ 
Decorative motifs often employed on the Art Deco building are spirals, sunflowers, steps, 
zigzags, triangles, double triangles, hexagons, fragmented circles, and seashells. 
Decorative ornament is generally rendered in low relief with sharp angular contours.'* The 
style also experimented with numerous metal alloys combining steel, bronze, nickel, 
silver, platinum, lead, and zinc for use in elevator doors, window frames, spandrels, 
decorative panels, and sculpture." 

In contrast to Art Deco architecture, Modeme, Streamline Modeme, or Art 
Modeme buildings emphasize the horizontal through the use of horizontal layering of 
bands of windows. The style is also characterized by soft, or rounded comers, flat roofs, 
and smooth wall finishes without surface omamentation.*" Aluminum or stainless steel 
are often used for door and window trim.^ The ideal Streamline Modeme building was a 
horizontal rectangular container, with dramatic rounded comers surmounted by a parapet 
or projecting thin roof slabs. The style was meant to project an image of a scientifically 
advanced, effortlessly hygienic world. The style also favored mass-produced, easy-to- 
install materials.* 



John J.-G. Blumenson, Identifying American Architecture: A Pictorial Guide to Styles and Terms. 1600- 
1945. 2nd Ed., revised and enlarged (New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1981 ): 77. 

David Gebhard, The National Trust Guide to Art Deco in America (New York: Preservation Press, 1996): 
6. 
Mbid.,p.7 

John J.-G. Blumenson, Identifying American Architecture: A Pictorial Guide to Styles and Terms. 1600- 
1945. 2nd Ed., revised and enlarged (New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1981): 79. 
' Ibid. 

David Gebhard, The National Trust Guide to Art Deco in America (New York: Preservation Press, 1996): 
10-11. 

38 



Constantine often combined the elements of Modeme architecture and the 
International Style in his designs — particularly in educational facilities. Many elements 

of the two styles overlap: flat roof 
tops, smooth uniformly finished walls, 
the complete absence of 
ornamentation, and roofs without 
eaves terminating flush with the plane 
of the wall. Along with these three 
modem styles, a few of his 
commercial designs were executed 
with classical detailing. Constantine's 
architectural designs vary greatly, and 
their sources of inspiration are 
unknown, but presumed to be client 
driven. Such vast differences in 
design can be seen when comparing 
the Chase Furniture Company Store (1946) at 414 King Street, St. Philip Street shops 
(1945) located at the comer of Wentworth and St. Philip Streets, Constantine's office 
building (1945), at 139 Calhoun Street, and Citizens and Southem National Bank [now 
the Small Business Resource Center] (1946), at 284 King Street. Chase Fumiture store 
stands today as it was originally designed with only a few interior ceiling light fixtures 




John J.-G. Blumenson, Identifiing American Architecture: A Pictorial Guide to Styles and Terms. 1600- 
1945, 2nd Ed., revised and enlarged (New York; W. W. Norton and Company, 1981); 75. 

39 



having been replaced after water damage in 1989.'*^ The building is a two-storv' Art Deco 
design that continues to house the Chase Furniture Company. The facade is sheathed in 
white and gray marble with an aluminum and plate glass storefront. The facade has a 
vertical emphasis created with the use of vertical strips of glass blocks, a vertical neon 
sign, stylized polychromatic decoration created by the gray marble bands, and a stepped 
linear fagade. The two large circular mirrored glass windows flanking the strips of glass 
block in the second storv' of the design were delineated as regular plate glass in the 
original drawings, but in Constantine's rendering they are shown as mirrored glass." As 
with many of his commercial structures, a colorftil terrazzo floor in the vestibule 
indicates the name of the business by spelling out C-H-A-S-E in red and white tiles. " 

In contrast to the verticality of Chase Furniture Company. St. Philip Street Shops, 
which were commissioned by Wentworth Realty Company (owned by Albert Sottile), are 
horizontal in nature, tvpical of Modeme buildings. The shops were three, one-story, 
discrete buildings unified by one s>'mmetrical facade.'" The original design indicates that 
Constantine wanted almost the entire facjade to be constructed of "strucmral glass" in 
cream, green, and black horizontal layers. Possibly this strucmral glass was acmally 
meant to be Vitrolite or Carrara glass. V'itrolite, or Carrara glass is a thin panel of 



Mr. Joseph Chase, current owTier, in an interview with author. 2 10 00. 
" South Carolina Historical Societ\'. .Augustus Edison Constantine, Chase Furniture Store, .\rchitectural 
Drawings. 1946. .\n original rendering by Constantine can be found in the office of Chase Furniture 
Company. 414 King Street. Charleston. South Carolina. 
';lbid 
'" Working drawings, 1945. On file at the offices of Constantine and Constantine Architects. 

40 



colored glass available in black, white, green, blue, red, and other colors, and was a very 
popular material used in Modeme buildings. . 

The plans of the St. Philip Street Shops show concrete walkways between each 
unit that would have been entered through wrought iron gates of Constantine's design, 
with cream-colored brick surrounds. Half circular windows on the outer two shops point 



-^-T 






^-^™.T.,.-.<te5B 



1=,': |t^ -'-i -c\ '■- '• ■ \;-^i-" , i . 



m 



m:zizJ. 




tTS-OMT •LLtVATlOM 



Figure 5.2 St. Philip Street Shops Facade, 1945 



toward the central building that has two large square plate glass windows flanking the 

central entrance. 
The roof is flat 
with a central 
parapet of 
structural glass 
with a white 
cement cap. 

Constantine also designed low brick walls on either side of the complex penetrated by a 




'■* David Gebhard, The National Trust Guide to Art Deco in America (New York: Preservation Press, 1996): 
1 1 . The specifications from these plans are missing; so one can only speculate what was meant by cream. 



41 



semi-circular wrought iron designs. The design also called for a wrought iron gate with 
brick piers between the neighboring building on the south and the brick wall. 

At some point, the northern most building was demolished, and modifications 
were made to the remaining 
fa9ade, which has been stuccoed 
over. The brick walls and 
wrought iron gates are gone as 
well. (The materials employed 
in the construction of Modem 
style buildings do not age well 
unless they are continually 
refurbished, which might 
explain why the facade has since 
been stuccoed.)'" 

Constantine moved his 
office from 149 Calhoun Street to his newly designed Modeme building at 139 Calhoun 
Street in 1946.'^ The building was actually commissioned by his Brother-in-Law, John 
P. Botzis, who occupied one of the shops on the ground floor. Constantine occupied a 
suite of offices on the second that were specifically designed for his practice. An article 
in the [Charleston] News and Courier (1946) touts the suite being the only place in 




green, or black structural glass. 

'I "'''^- 

'^ "Constantine, Architect, Opens Calhoun St. Office," [Charleston] News and Courier (September 3 1 . 

1 946). Architects File, Post and Courier Archives. 

'^ Measured Drawings, 139 Calhoun Street, 1945. Offices of Constantine and Constantine Architects. 



42 



Charleston having been specifically designed as an architect's office.'^ The suite once 
included a reception room, Constantine's private office, a consultation library with a 
substantial architectural library, and a drafting room large enough to accommodate 

twelve draftsmen. Glass blocks were 
installed in an interior partition to allow 
more natural light through the only 
windows in the front of the building.''' 
The primary fa9ade is of white 
Georgia marble with a horizontal group 
of aluminum-framed casement 
windows on the second floor, and an 
aluminum and plate glass store front on 
the ground floor."" Typical of Modeme 
architecture, the roof is flat, with a 
parapet, and the fa9ade is devoid of 
ornamentation. The entrance to a 
staircase leading to the second floor is 
on the east side of the facade, which is 
slightly recessed, with a vertical strip of 




Figure 5.5 Citizens and Southern 
National Bank 



Untitled Article, [Charleston] News and Courier (April 27, 1950). Architects File. Post and Courier 
Archives. 

"Constantine, Architect, Opens Calhoun St. Office," [Charleston] News and Courier (September 3 1 , 
1946). Architects File, Post and Courier Archives. 

Charleston County Library, South Carolina History Room, Buildings file. Untitled Newspaper article, 
April 4, 1948. 

43 



glass blocks, four blocks wide above it. Despite there being three distinct entrances for 
three disparate businesses in this building, the fa9ade has an over all unified appearance. 

In 1946 Citizens and Southern National Bank of South Carolina commissioned 
Constantine to modify the facade, and complete interior renovations of their existing 
building at 284 King Street. The work was completed in 1948. Although the use has 
since changed, an article in a 1948 addition of the News and Courier, the local 
newspaper, adequately described the building as having a fa(;ade remodeled along 
Georgian lines, of "old Charleston brick and limestone" with wrought iron balconies at 
the second story windows, and grilles on the first story windows.^' Constantine designed 
limestone pediments supported 
by scrolls over the second story 
windows, and a broken 
pediment over the main 
entrance, with a pineapple in 
the middle — Charleston's 
symbol for welcome.'" He also 
enlarged and modified the interior by adding mahogany cornices, pilasters, and 
wainscoting throughout. Constantine designed a pedimented and shouldered door 
surround of mahogany on the interior of the main entrance. He also installed a new vault 
in the rear of the building, which is now used as a conference room. Interior and exterior 
details of this building contrast greatly with those of other commercial buildings designed 




Figure 5.6 C & S Bank, Interior Detail 



Charleston County Library, South Carolina History Room, Buildings file. Untitled Newspaper article, 
April 4, 1948. 



44 



"i 



i 



by Constantine. More typical of his commercial buildings are the Chase Furniture 
Company Store, or the building designed for Marilyn Shoes at the comer of King and 
Liberty Streets: with their stripped down. Art Deco or Modeme fa9ades, and plain, 
largely uninterrupted interior spaces. 

Aside from designing the St. Philip Street Shops for Wentworth Realty, 

Constantine obtained 
many commissions from 
Albert Sottile. The Sottile 
family was involved in 
several real estate ventures 
in Charleston, but they are 
most well known for their 
involvement with theater 
buildings. Albert Sottile 
owned most if not all of 
the theaters on the 
peninsula, as well as the 
surrounding area. 
Constantine was 

commissioned by the Sottile family to design new theaters throughout the city, as well as 
modify existing ones. He designed and modified The Little Gem Theatre, now the 
Arcade Theatre and Shops (1947 with modifications m 1949, 1950, and 1957). He 




Figure 5.7 American Theatre 



South Carolina Historical Society, Augustus Edison Constantine, architectural drawings for 284 King 

45 



completed interior renovations and additions, and created a new facade for the American 
Theatre (1946), as well as interior renovations to the Gloria (1947, 1951, 1952), Majestic 
(1947), Garden (1947, 1949) and Riviera (1952) Theatres."'' Constantine was also 
commissioned, again by companies owned by Albert Sottile, to design five other new 
theatres that were never executed."^ 

The two theatres in the Old and Historic District that Constantine did the most 
work on are the American Theatre and the Arcade Theatre."'^ The American Theatre is 
another Art Deco design, although it does not have the same emphasis in verticality that 
Chase Furniture store does. The theater has a two-toned, stepped facade that is 
interrupted by the horizontal marquee and neon sign. It has a plain facade when 
compared to Constantine's other Art Deco buildings. The only ornament are two highly 



.J.]T_TLfe G€ill TH< «T R€i 




f UO NT CkEvATtOM 



Figure 5.8 Arcade Theatre, Rendering, 1947 



Street, 1946. 

South Carolina Historical Society, Augustus Edison Constantine, Individual theatre files, various dates. 

Augustus Edison Constantine, Jobs File, 1940-1970, kept in the offices of Constantine and Constantine 
Architects. Constantine was commissioned to design one theatre on King Street and one on Race Street in 
1 94 1 . He created a design for another theatre on King Street named the Elite Theatre ( 1 946), the Cynthia 
Theatre on Society Street (1947), and the Corona Theatre, again on Society Street, in 1954. 
" The architectural drawings for this building cannot be located. 



46 



abstract fluted pilasters flanking the central recessed portion of the fac^ade, which is 
pierced by eight rectangular decorative elements. The American Theatre was renovated 
in 1996 after having been closed since 1977."^ 

The Little Gem Theatre and Shops (later the Arcade Theatre and Shops) located 
on Liberty Street were designed in the Modeme mode. This symmetrical, one-story 
complex was designed as a theatre with four shops, U-shaped in plan wrapping around a 
landscaped courtyard. Constantine created this design to have a horizontal emphasis, 

with the fa9ade of 



the theatre to be of 
structural glass — 
presumably Vitrolite 
panels." There is a 
cast stone frieze on 
the exterior wall of 
the auditorium, 
which projects above 




Figure 5.9 The Arcade Theatre and Shops, current 
conditions 



the roofline of the main entrance and shops, with alternating triglyphs and circles in low 
relief, a hallmark of many of Constantine's designs. The storefront windows in all of the 
shops were originally designed of large square plate glass panels, surrounded by a row of 
glass blocks. ■^^ 



"'' John P. McDermott, "Movie Dimensions: New Theater to be a Far Cry From Old 3-D," [Charleston] 
Post and Courier (February 24, 1996): 6-B. 

South Carolina Historical Society, Augustus Edison Constantine. Arcade Theatre and Shops, measured 
drawings, 1947. 
'' Ibid. 



47 



When the complex was remodeled and enlarged in 1957, the facades of the shops 
were redone in yellow terra cotta brick, and the main entrance to the theatre was changed 
to large plate glass windows and doors, and black matte glazed tile. The shape of the 
parapet over the theater was changed, and an ornamental wrought iron railing was 
added." 

As with the other theatres, Constantine designed unique metal railings and 
balustrades for the balcony. The balustrade is a repeating circular pattern. He also 
designed a wrought iron pergola in the courtyard." In 1957, interior alterations were also 
completed to include an ornamental ceiling design in the theater. The over-all shape of 
the design is a 20'x 41 ' rectangle outlined in wood molding. Inside the rectangle are two 
semicircles tlanking a central square, all made out of neon tubing. The design was filled 
in by acoustic celotex tiles and Ya" plywood. 

Through lack of appreciation, this complex of buildings has been badly neglected. 
At some point in the past the current occupants erected a large plywood screen in the 
front courtyard, attached directly to the pergola. The courtyard has also been filled in 
with cement. The awnings above the shop doors and windows are in a state of disrepair, 
and the doors and windows that front on the side walk as well as in the courtyard reveal 
only solid curtains with no interior activity. 

There are only two churches on the peninsula that were designed by Constantine: 
Ebenezer A. M. E. Church (1945) and Morris Street Baptist Church (1967). Although 
they were designed more than twenty years apart, they are very similar stylistically and 



^' South Carolina Historical Society, Augustus Edison Constantine. Arcade Theatre and Shops, measured 
drawings, 1957. 
'« Ibid. 

48 



unlike any other churches he designed elsewhere in the Charleston area. Ebenezer 
A.M.E. Church is located at 44 Nassau Street. It is a simple, small, unassuming red brick 
building. The main entrance lies in a central projecting pavilion reminiscent of a Greek 
portico with a pediment, flanking pilasters, and two vertical bands of white stucco 
pierced by small octagonal windows. A small tower pushes up out of the gable end 
above the pavilion ending in a copper-covered domical roof The combination of the 
facade elements and the telescoping effect of the tower all lend to adding verticality to 
the building even 
though it is 
lacking a steeple. 

All of 
the trim around 
doors and 
windows, as well 
as the trim and 
louvres in the 
tower are painted 
white in stark 
contrast with the 

red brick. Many of Constantine's designs carry this hallmark characteristic of white 
stucco or wooden, vertical and horizontal bands and trim, in contrast with dark red brick: 
Marion Square Bandstand and Comfort Station (1944, demolished 3/17/2000), Morris 




49 



Street Baptist Church (1967), Van Smith Building Materials Company (1949), St. Luke's 
A. M. E. Church Recreation Building ( 1950), and Courtenay School ( 1953).^" Frequently 
these designs are highly abstract Classical details, of friezes and pilasters. Other times 
they seem to be elements reflective of architectural trends of the time attempting to 
mimick the International Style, as in Courtenay School. 

Courtenay School (commissioned in 1953, completed in 1955) is one of only two 
schools designed by Constantine that were constructed on the peninsula of Charleston. 
Aside from the treatment of the facades with bands of white stucco, the designs for 
Courtenay School as well as all other public schools are not typical of his work. They are 
not representative examples of Constantine's creations, and will not be discussed in great 
detail. Constantine had very little involvement in the actual design of public school 




Figure 5.12 Courtenay School 



buildings. Jimmy Liollio and John Tracy Powers worked on most of the designs, which 
typical of the 1950s, were designed with little ornamentation, and were plain. 



' See Appendix D for images. 



50 



unappealing boxes with windows. In the end, Constantine would add something to the 
design around the front entrance to give the plain box some aesthetic appeal. "*■* Courtenay 
School and Burke Industrial School (now Burke High School, designed in 1948, with 
additions in 1952, 1972, and 1973) were both designed with the assistance of Perkins and 
Will, Inc., an architectural firm founded in 1935, which first gained national recognition 
for their designs of educational facilities.^" 

According to School Planning: The Architectural Record of a Decade, a book that 
would have been found in Constantine's office, the primary concerns with school design 
during the 1950s seemed to have been cost reduction and how well the building 




functioned." School buildings of this time were generally constructed of reinforced 
concrete or concrete block, with steel frames to be fireproof and relatively inexpensive. 



Demetrios Liollio in interview with author, 1/13/00. 
Elliott Constantine in interview with author 3/28/00. 
Elliott Constantine, in interview with author 3/28/00. 
*■ ibid. This is apparent from all of the case studies in the book. 

51 



They also had interior plywood partitions for flexible spaces. New approaches in 
education and the use of facilities within each school, demanded changes in the way 
schools were planned and constructed. ' Throughout the entirety of the book, there is no 
mention of how school buildings looked, only how well they served their purposes, and 
how well lit and ventilated the individual buildings were. According to Demetrios 
Liollio, another great concern was that the building must be able to handle future 
expansion." These trends and thoughts about the design of educational facilities may 
explain why so many educational facilities designed in the 1950s are not attractive 
structures. 

In the 1950s public schools placed an emphasis on implementing programs to 
teach vocational skills as opposed to instruction in theoretical subjects to their students: 
home making for women and trades such as auto mechanics, tool making, die casting, 
and sheet metal work for the men.""* Plan types recommended for these industrial or 
vocational schools were single-story buildings that housed all activities under one roof, or 
the creation of a campus with several separate buildings like Burke Industrial School. ' 

Another practice of the 1950s was to encourage community at large to use the 
school building(s) for such things as W. P. A. sewing, gymnasium and recreational 
classes, women's clubs, church organizations, and parents' meetings. The premise 



Kenneth Reid, A. 1. A., School Planning: Architectural Record of a Decade (New York: F. W. Dodge 
Corporation. 1950): 54, 61, 70. 
'" Ibid., 9. 
^' In interview with author, 1/13/00. 

Kenneth Reid. A. I. A., School Planning: Architectural Record of a Decade (New York: F. W. Dodge 
Corporation, 1950): 5. 
"' Ibid., p. 9. 

52 



behind this was to have all adult lite center around the school making it community 
property, therefore better cared for/"^ 

All of these changes in how the buildings were viewed and used help explain why 
school buildings of this time were designed the way they were. They were to be multi- 
functional buildings with flexible spaces, well ventilated and lit, and designed within a 
low budget. No concern was given to exterior ornament, or interior decoration beyond 
paint colors that reflected light well. The schools that Constantine's firm designed seem 
to be what he would have referred to as "match-box architecture" that he disliked so 
much. All Constantine seemed able to influence in the designs was to create a unique 
entrance to each of the schools. 

In general, Constantine's residential architecture is quite a bit different from his 




commercial designs. His clients seemed to have preferred more traditional houses in the 
Colonial Revival style, especially those who lived on the peninsula and north of 
Charleston in Summerville, South Carolina. One such design is a residence 



Ibid., p. 24. 



53 



commissioned by Edward Kronsberg (1949). The house is located at 97 Hagood Street 
and is now the Citadel Alumni House. It is a slightly asymmetrical two-story brick 
building with a hip roof with slate tiles. A breezeway connects the house and garage, 
which also has a hip roof and small cupola. The breezeway contains Constantine's 
signature contemporary wrought iron railing design, with a modified version of the same 
being used on the interior.'^'' One other contemporary feature which does not appear on 
the original plans, but is found in a rendering from the same year: a vertical band of glass 
block, two blocks wide. The glass blocks are located on one side of the door, and break 
through the stringcourse on the second story. There is no evidence in the physical 
fabric of the house that these glass blocks were ever added. 

There are very few elements of exterior ornamentation: only jack arches above the 
windows of the first floor, a decorative pattern in brick around the second story windows, 
with a string course below. The main entrance boasts a handsome three panel, double 
door with the middle panel being circular, and a wrought iron and stucco design above 
the door in the shape and pattern of an elliptical fanlight. " 

In addition to designing single-family homes, Constantine also designed 
apartment buildings. Washington Realty commissioned him as part of the National 
Housing Agency's, Home Use Program to convert an old bagging mill on Meeting Street, 
between Ann and John Streets, into apartments referred to as Chicco Apartments (now 



■" Augustus Edison Constantine, Kronsberg Residence, measured drawings, 1949. South Carolina 

Historical Society. 

^^ Ibid. 

■*■ Ibid. No interior details are available except for floor plans and the staircase. 

54 



the Hampton Inn) (1946).'**' The old bagging mill consisted of two masonry buildings 
perpendicular to each other, and a single story, six bay building fronting on Meeting 
Street. Constantine designed canopies to connect all three structures."*^ The building 
facing Meeting Street was three stories, which Constantine converted into five stories. 
The building fronting on John Street is now three stories. Eighty-two units were created 
total.^' 

The buildings are both massive, solid structures with simple low relief 
ornamentation carved in the stucco sheathing. The ornamentation is once again abstract 
Classical details such as a frieze of alternating triglyphs and circles, and vertical bands of 




darker, slightly projecting stucco, alternating with the windows, possibly meant to 
represent pilasters or a colonade. The single story structure is gone, but was meant to 



Augustus Edison Constantine, Chicco Apartments, measured drawings, 1946. South Carolina Historical 
Society. 
'' Ibid. 

55 



house shops. It had six double, nine over nine sash windows, which Constantine restored 
and reused in his design. "* The entrances for all of the buildings were the same: double 
wooden doors with a rectangular divided light above, and flanking stucco, fluted 
pilasters. 

In studying Constantine's designs over all, it seems that while he was enamored 
with the Classical tradition, he did have a fairly good understanding of Art Deco and 
Modeme architecture in which he produced some fine examples in Charleston. However, 
when it came to post-war modem styles, he had difficulty. In the 1950s Constantine did 
not create any truly modem buildings on the peninsula, and most of his commissions 
were for school buildings. Those commissions that were not from school boards were 
executed in Art Deco and Modeme styles, or with Classical motifs: County Hall at 1000 
King Street (1953), both designs for McAlister's Mortuary (1953 and 1956), and Blessed 
Sacrament Church on U.S. Highway 17 (1950).'" 

Constantine proved himself willing to produce post-war modemist designs. In 
1953, he created a beach house for the Condon Family on Sullivan's Island, South 
Carolina, which was somewhat beholden to the work of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. The 
design was similar to that of the Famsworth house: a volumetric rectangular box. 
However, Constantine's design was of concrete block and glass with an overhanging flat 
roof, and never really expresses the same feeling that the Famsworth house does. The 



'' Ibid. 

■"^ Ibid. The floor plans for each story were the same, with two slightly different apartment types 

throughout. All of the apartments were designed with one bedroom, a living room, and a kitchen-dinette 

combination. No other interior details are available. 

^^ See appendix D for images. 

56 



Condon's Beach House has more mass than volume by far. ^' This lack of post-war 
modernist designs on the peninsula is most likely due to the conservative nature of 
Charlestonians that has been demonstrated repeatedly throughout the history of the city, 
rather than unwillingness on the part of Constantine to create them. 



Condon's Beach House, measured drawings, 1953. Constantine and Constantine Architects. 

57 



Conclusion 

Augustus Edison Constantine, while practicing in Charleston, South Carolina, in 
the mid-20''^ Century, dared to create some unique designs when compared with those of 
his peers. Unfortunately his designs go under-appreciated today, and are one by one 
being lost. The decades of the 1940s and 50s are important in the history of this country 
and deserve to be reflected in the streetscape in Charleston The fact that Art Deco and 
Moderne designs, or any building constructed prior to 1925, are not considered historic in 
Charleston is preposterous. Where does one draw the line at what is deemed historic'^ 
Events that occurred 100 years ago are no more or less a part of history than events that 
occurred 50 or even 5 years ago. It would be a shame if 100 years from now, historians 
were to remark that Charlestonians of the 2r* Century were short sighted in their 
preservation efforts—in the same way historians today shake their heads at the losses of 
great monuments that were not appreciated in the late 19 ' and early 20" Centuries. 

Constantine' s designs were not widely accepted in conservative Charleston. The 
evidence for this appeared in the newspaper articles of the day denouncing modern 
architecture and promoting the traditional styles. Had Constantine remained in Atlanta, a 
larger, less conservative city, he might have been able to explore more contemporary 
designs. The fact that Art Deco and Moderne buildings were executed and survive in 
Charleston, makes them all the more precious to this city With Charleston's current 
preservation practices, which basically deem any building less than 75 years old to be of 
little value, it will not be long before they are all lost. A homogeneous 19 '-century 

58 



streetscape is a preservation mistake tliat Cliarleston is coming close to realizing. It 
seems that the best way to avoid creating a theme park atmosphere in Charleston, is to 
recognize the value of good buildings created. 



59 



Bibliography 
Primary Sources 



Alston, John A. "Do You Know Your Charleston? Bandstand May Regain Prominence, 
[Charleston, South Carolina] News and Courier, August 27, 1973: B-1. 

"American, The, New Theater on King Street Opening." Charleston 

Evening Post. July 19. 1942. Theaters File. The South Carolina History Room. 
Charleston County Library. 

"Architectural Styles Preserved," Charleston Evening Post . February 

22,1957. Architecture File The South Carolina History Room Charleston 
County Library. 

"Augustus E. Constantine, Noted Architect, Dies." [Charleston, South 
CaxoXxm] News and Courier, November 14, 1976: 15-A. 

Baldwin Directory Company, Inc., et. AI. Baldwin and Southern 's Charleston South 
Carolina City Directory. Charleston, South Carolina: Baldwin Directory 
Company, Inc., and Southern Printing and Publishing Company, 1940, 1942, 
1944, and 1948. 

"Bandstand to Be Erected Soon in Marion Square." [Charleston, 

South Carolina] News and Courier, March 26, 1944. Parks File. The South 
Carolina History Room. Charleston County Library. 

Behre, Robert. "City Asked Not to Pick, Choose Worthy History." [Charleston, South 
Carolina] Post and Courier, September 20, 1998: B-1 

. "City Asked Not to Pick," [Charleston, South Carolina] Post and Courier, 

September 1, 1998: B-1. 



Behre, Robert "Design Philosophies at Odds Over Library," [Charleston, South Carolina] 
Post and Courier, April 3, 2000: C-1. 

"C. T. Cummings Dies Unexpectedly," [Charleston] NeM's and Courier, May 12, 1967. 
Biography File, The South Carolina History Room, Charleston County Library. 

"A City that Lives as a Monument," New York Times Magazine. 

November 1, 1931, n. p. Architecture File. The South Carolina History Room. 
Charleston County Library. 



60 



"Charleston Architect, Albert Simons Dies," The State, May 25, 1980: 4-H 

City of Charleston Zoning Ordinance, Article 2: Part 6. City of Charleston Department 
of Planning and Urban Development Charleston, South Carolina 

"Constantine, Architect, Opens Calhoun St. Office," [Charleston, South Carolina] News 
and Courier, September 31, 1946. Architects File, Post and Conner Archives. 

Constantine and Constantine Architects. Augustus Edison Constantine, Jobs File, 1940- 
1970. 

. Condon's Beach House, measured drawings, 1953. Constantine and Constantine 

Architects. 

Greene, Harlan. "Recent Manuscript Accessions," South Carohna Historical Magazine. 
Vol. 85 (Jan 1984): 81. 

Harrill, Ed. "Bandstand May Be Razed: Marion Square's History Varied." Charleston 
Evening Post, August 21, 1961. Parks File. The South Carolina History Room. 
Charleston County Library. 

International Library of Technology. A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in 

Engineering Professions, Trades, and Vocational Occupations or for Those Who 
Desire Information Concerning Them: Arithmetic, Irigonometry, and Graphs 
Logarithms. Scranton: International Textbook Company, 1922. 

. A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in Engineering 

Professions, Trades, and Vocational Occupations or for Those Wlio Desire 
Information Concerning Them: Building Superintendence, Specifications, 
Estimating, Contracts, Permits. Scranton: International Textbook Company, 
1922. 

. A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in Engineering Professions, Trades, 

and Vocational Occupations or for Those Wlio Desire Information Concerning 
Them: Common Brickwork: Face and Ornamental Brickwork: Architectural 
Terra Cotta: Hollow Tile; Building Stone: Lathing, Plastering, and Tiling; 
Lighting Fixtures; Architectural Design. Scranton: International Textbook 
Company, 1922. 

. A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in Engineering 

Professions, Trades, and Vocational Occupations or for Those Wlio Desire 
Information Concerning Them: Fireproofing of Buildings: Stair Building; 
Ornamental Metal Work; Builders' Hardware; Roofing; Sheet-Metal Work; Mill 
Design. Scranton: International Textbook Company, 1922. 



61 



. A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in Engineering 

Professions, Trades, and Vocational Occupations or for Those WJio Desire 
Information Concerning Them: Geometrical, Ornamental, Architectural, 
Freehand, and Perspective Drawing. Scranton; International Textbook Company, 
1922. 

. A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in Engineenng 

Professions, Trades, and Vocational Occupations or for Those [Vlio Desire 
Information Concerning Them: Masonry; Carpentry; Joinejy; Steel Square. 
Scranton: International Textbook Company, 1922. 

Koon, Warren. "Drawing Board Philosopher." [Charleston, South Carolina] Post and 
Courier, August 19, 1966. Biographies- Constantine File. The South Carolina 
History Room. Charleston County Library. 



"Letter to the Editor," [Charleston, South Carolina] News and Courier. 

December 12, 1933. The Po5/ a/ /^ Cow/e/- Archives. Charleston, South 
Carolina. 

Lofton, Sally. "Bandstand's Fate: Trumpet of Doom Might Be Muted." Charleston 
Evening Post, July 19, 1973, p. IB. 

"McAlister's Inc. In its 75^'' Year" [Charleston, South Carolina] News and Courier, 
October 22, 1961. 150 Wentworth Street File The South Carolina History 
Room. Charleston County Library. 

"McAlister's Moves to New Funeral Home on Wentworth Street." [Charleston, South 

CaroWrn.] News and Courier, February n, 1960. 150 Wentworth Street File. The 
South Carolina History Room. Charleston County Library. 

McDermott, John P. "Movie Dimensions: New Theater to be a Far Cry From Old 3-D." 
[Charleston, South Carolina] Post and Courier, February 24, 1996, p. B6. 

Nelsons' Baldwin's Directory Company, Inc. Nelsons ' Baldwin 's Charleston South 
Carolina City Directory. Charleston, South Carolina: Nelsons' Baldwin's 
Directory Company, Inc, 1950-51, 1955. 

Nelsons' Directory Company, Inc. Nelsons ' Charleston South Carolina City Directory. 
Charleston, South Carolina: Nelsons' Directory Company, Inc., 1958. 

"New Mortuary Cost to Top $150,000." [Charleston, South Carolina] News and Courier, 
September 12, 1958. 150 Wentworth Street File. The South Carolina History 
Room. Charleston County Library 



62 



"New Theater is Operating." Charleston Evening Post, September 20, 1944 Theaters 
File. The South Carolina History Room. Charleston County Library 

Sanchez, Jonathan. "American Theater to Revive Past " [Charleston, South Carolina] 

Post and Courier, November 14, 1996. Theaters File. The South Carolina History 
Room. Charleston County Library. 

"Set for Dedication: Hellenic Center's Formal Opening Ceremony." Newspaper 
clipping c. 1941. 30 Race Street File. The South Carolina History Room. 
Charleston County Library. 

"Simons and Lapham Return from War Duty to Architecture," [Charleston, South 

Carolina] News and Courier (January 20, 1946) Architects Biography File South 
Carolina History Room, Charleston County Library 

South Carolina Historical Society. Augustus Edison Constantine. 

Additions to Arcade Theatre and Surrounding Shops, July 1957. 

. Augustus Edison Constantine Arcade Theatre and Shops for 

Pasttime Amusement, Nos. 1 & 3 Liberty Street, 1950 

. Augustus Edison Constantine. Blueprints; Seigling 

Music House Alteration, 1946-7; 1973. 

. Augustus Edison Constantine, Chicco Apartments, measured drawings, 1946 

. Augustus Edison Constantine. Constantine and Constantine Projects, 

1934-1979. 

. Augustus Edison Constantine, Constantine residence at 5"' and Margaret Street, 

unexecuted. 

. Augustus Edison Constantine, Kronsberg Residence, measured drawings, 1949 

. Augustus Edison Constantine. Liberty Street Shop, rear of 297 

King Street, 1945. 

. Augustus Edison Constantine. Measured Drawings of Alterations to 

Water Works, 14 George Street, n.d. 

. Augustus Edison Constantine. Morris Street Baptist Church, n d 

. Augustus Edison Constantine, Student drawings, 1920-21. 



63 



Augustus Edison Constantine. Theatre for Pasttime Amusement 
Company, 1 Liberty Street, 1946. 

Augustus Edison Constantine Verenes Estate, Aiken, SC, 1935. 

Genealogy File. "Charleston Architect, Samuel Lapham, Dies," [Charleston, 
South Carolina] Post and Courier, October 2, 1972 

McDonald Papers. Letter to Joseph Needle, City Engineer, February 8, 1955. 



Stambaugh, Barbara J. "Do You Know Your Charleston? Fate of Bandstand is Still 

Uncertain," [Charleston, South Carolina] News and Courier. November 6, 196L 
On file in the South Carolina History Room at the Charleston County Library, 
Parks File. 

Stockton, Robert. "Local Architect Honored for Many Contributions." [Charleston, South 
Carolina] News atid Courier, November 1 1, 1973 The South Carolina History 
Room. Charleston County Library Biographies- Constantine File 



Secondary Sources 

Bland, Sydney. Prese}'\'iug Charleston's Past, Shaping its Future. Columbia: University 
of South Carolina Press, 1999 

Blumenson, John J.-G. Identijying American Architecture: A Pictorial Guide to Styles 

and Terms, 1600-1945. 2"^ Ed., Revised and Enlarged New York W W Norton 
& Company, 1981. 

"Charleston Earthquake, 1886," The Cohimbia Record Magazine, August 21, 1961. 

Earthquake File, The South Carolina History Room. Charleston County Library. 

Chase, Charles Edwin. "Charleston: Guarding Her Customs, Buildings, and Laws," 
Historic Preservation Forum Magazine. Fall 1998 

Dowling, Elizabeth Meredith. American Classicist: The Architecture of Phihp Trammel/ 
Shiitze. New York: Rizzoli, 1989. 

Gebhard, David. The National Trust Guide to Art Deco in America. New York: 
Preservation Press, 1996. 

Hosmer, Charles B. Jr. Preservation Comes of Age: From Wi/hcmisburg to the National 
Trust, 1926-1949. Charlottesville: The University Press of Virginia, 1981. 



64 



Leland, Jack. "The Holy City Has Burned, Burned, Burned." [Charleston] Evening Post. 
Februap/4, 1979: 6-C. 

Melendez, F. "Architects in Profile: Albert Simons, F.A.I A.," Preservation Progress, 
Vol. 8, No. 2, March 1963: 4 

Miller, Gardner B. "Simons leaves BAR 'Action' After 43 Years," [Charleston, South 
Carolina] News and Courier. June 16, 1975, p. 1-B. 

Poston, Jonathan H. 77?^ Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City 's Architecture. 
Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1997. 

Radford, John P. "Social Structure and Urban Form: Charleston, 1860-1880, in Walter J 
Fraser and Winifred B. Moore, Eds., From the Old South to the New: Essays on 
the Transitional South. Westport, Connecticut, 1981 

Reid, Kenneth, School Planning: Architectural Record of a Decade. New York: F. W. 
Dodge Corporation, 1950. 

Rlioad, Debbi. "The Board of Architectural Review in Charleston, 193 1-1993," 
Preserx'ation Progess. Spring 1993. 

Shull, Carol D. and Beth L. Savage, "Trends in Recognizing Places for Significance in 
the Recent Past," Historic Preservation Forum Magazine, Fall 1 995. 

Valentine, Lucia and Alan Valentine, The American Academy m Rome. Charlottesville, 
University of Virginia Press, 1973 

Verner, Elizabeth O'Neill. Prints and Impressions of Charleston. Columbia, South 
Carolina, 1939. 

Whitelaw, Robert N.S. and Alice F. Levkoff, A Histoty in Photographs: Charleston 
Come Hell or High Water. Charleston: Alice F. Levkoff and Patti F Whitelaw 
1974. 



65 



APPENDIX A: MAPS 



66 



H^^K- 














f^;i|:,i;i^^^^^^^ 






7- ,Mrii*co*ST*t 




\ C /^ /) /7 i_ jr 

Figure A.l Old and Historic District Boundaries, 1931 



67 



life 






Ite^--- 







xsfey 



/ '•^fo?i%^f^^$!^^ 







;n^"vr-'^-^--;.'''^'' 



:'::^ •» -'■;. 






,. ,. •••" •; ■-. 'v;^ ,/, A<^' 



'S> 














^;i.-t 



-""T 



Figure A. 2 Old and Historic District Boundaries, 1966 




69 




Figure A. 4 Old and Historic District Boundaries, 1997 



70 



APPENDIX B: COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF COURSE 

WORK 



71 



Comprehensive List of Course Work 



International Correspondence Schoof 

Geometrical Drawing 
Projection Drawing 
Freehand and Ornamental Drawing 
Wash Work and Brush Drawing 
Elementary Perspective Drawing 
Architectural Drawing 

Fireproofing of Buildings 
Stair Building 
Ornamental Metal Work 
Builders' Hardware 
Roofing 

Sheet-Metal Work 
Mill Design 

Geometry Mensuration 
Electric Wiring and Bellwork 
Design of Roof Beams 
Design of Columns 
Design of Roof Trusses 
Design of Plate Girders 

Common Brickwork 

Face and Ornamental Brickwork 

Architectural Terra Cotta 

Hollow Tile 

Building Stone 

Lathing, Plastering, and Tiling 

Lighting Fixtures 

Architectural Design 

Building Superintendence 
Specification Writing 
Specification- Writing Memoranda 
Estimating and Calculating Quantities 
Contracts 
Permits 

This list does not reflect the order in which Constantine may have taken tlie courses The groups reflect 
how the courses are bound in textbooks. See bibhography for titles w ritten b> the International Libran, of 
Tecluiology. 

72 



International Correspondence School (Continued) 

Operations Preliminary to Building 

Limes, Cements, and Mortars 

Excavating, Shoring, and Piling 

Stone Masonry 

Concrete Construction 

Areas, Vaults, and Retaining Walls 

Carpentry 

Mechanics of Carpentry 

Joinery 

The Steel Square 

Elements of Arithmetic 

Fractions 

Decimals 

Weights and Measures 

Ratio and Proportion 

Powers and Roots 

Mensuration 

Formulas 

Cube Root 

Trigonometry and Graphs 

Use of Trigonometric Table 

Commercial Calculations 

Logarithms 



Georgia School of Technology" 

First Term: 

Shades and Shadows 

Elements of Architecture 

Architectural Design 

History of Architecture, Ancient 

Charcoal Drawing 

Building Construction, Masonry 

Sanitation of Buildings 

Pen and Ink Drawing 

Military Instruction 



Georgia School of Technology, Blue Fnnts. 1920-1921. p 40-42. 

73 



Georgia School of Technology (Continued) 

Second Term: 

Perspective 

Architectural Design 

History of Architecture, Mediaeval 

Charcoal Drawing 

Building Construction, Masonry 

Cast Drawing 

Pen and Ink Drawing 

Water Color Drawing 

Military Instruction 

Third Term: 

Architectural Design 

History of Architecture, Modern 

Cast Drawing 

Archaeology 

Building Construction, Carpentry 

Professional Practice 

History of Art 

Pen and Pencil Rendering 

Water Color Drawing 

Graphic Statistics 

Military Instruction 

Fourth Term: 

Architectural Design 

Historic Ornament 

Building Construction, Carpentry 

Professional Practice 

History of Art 

Antique Drawing I 

Antique Drawing II 

Pen and Pencil Rendering 

Military Instruction 



74 



APPENDIX C: THE LEDGER 



Sources: 



Constantine, Augustus Edison. "Job File [1940-1970]," kept in the 

offices of Constantine and Constantine Architects, Charleston, South 
Carolina. 

Constantine and Constantine Architects "Job Record [1952- 

present]," kept in the offices of Constantine and Constantine Architects, 
Charleston, South Carolina 

Constantine and Constantine Architects. Building plans on file, 
various jobs, various dates. 

South Carolina Historical Society. Augustus Edison Constantine, 

Papers, 1913-1975. Partial Ledger, Author Unknown, either Augustus 
Constantine or Elliott Constantine. 

South Carolina Historical Society. Augustus Edison Constantine. 
Building plans on file, various jobs, various dates. 

An asterisk [*] denotes that the plans are on file at the South Carolina Historical 
Society. 



75 



JOB# 


CLIENT 


PROJECT 


ADDRESS 


COST 


1926 1 




Atlanta Athletic 
Club 


Entrance, doorway 


Atlanta, GA 




1927 1 




George Moore 


Residence 


Atlanta, GA 




1934 1 




U.S. 
Government 


Chapel and 
Administration Building 


Fort Benning, GA 


$500,000 


1935 1 




Verenes Estate 


House 


Aiken, SC 




1936 1 




R. J. Reynolds 


Rehabilitation and New 
Construction 


Sapelo Island, 
GA 


$600,000 




Above project inc 
construction of a 
garage, a lighting 


ludes, rehab of a 35 room main house. New 
power plant, barn, machine shops, a 
and power system 




3616 


University of 
Georgia 


Marine Biology 
Laboratory additions 


Georgia 






Various clients 
(see next entry) 


Apartments and 
residences 


Georgia 


$1,150,000 


3622 


Mr. And Mrs. J. 
H. Therrill 


New House 


Charleston 




3627 


R. J. Reynolds 


Alterations and Additions 
to Long Creek Lodge 


Devotion, NC 




1937 




Various clients 


Apartments, schools, 
residences, fire stations, 
etc. 


Georgia 


$1,000,000 



76 



3711 


Al Remler 


Nightclub 


Savannah, GA 


^ 


3716 


Reinhart College 


Girls' Dormitory Building 


Waleska, GA 




1938 


381 


Mr. And Mrs. C. 
Evans Joseph 


New House 


Atlanta, GA 






Mr. & Mrs. A. 
Constantine 


residence 


Atlanta, GA 




1939 


3904 


FHA Housing 
Project 


Apartment Building 


Alberta Street, 
Charleston, SC 






State of Georgia 


Office Building 


Atlanta, GA 


$1,000,000 


1940 1 


240 


George 
Misoyanis 


Additions and Alterations 


Corner of Spring 
and President 
Streets 




4025 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Demos Pappas 


Residence 


Grove Street 




4025 


Grecian Society 


School Building and 
auditorium 


30 Race Street 


$30,000 


4027 


Mr. And Mrs. 

Frank 

Lawandales 


Residence 


Grove Street 




4028 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Demos Pappas 


Residence 


Grove Street 




4029 


Ashley Ice- 
cream Company 


New Factory Building 


Meeting Street 




4034 


Mr. And Mrs. A. 
E. Constantine 


New House Wagner 
Heights, and Additions to 
Grove Street House 


Wagner Terrace 
and Grove Street 




4037 


1. H. Hyman 


Residence and 
Apartment Building 


Corner of Broad 
Street and 
Ashley Avenue 


unexecuted 



77 



1941 1 


4100 


Mr. L M. 
Copleston 


Residence 


Murray Blvd. 




4102 


Miss Artimisha 
Cobia and Mr. 
C. Costopulous 


Residence 


Mt. Pleasant and 
Hester Street 




4103 


Mr. C. 0. 
Thompson 


Residence 


Vanderhorst 
Street 




4105 


Adolph and Fred 
Gamelin 


Alterations 


236 King Street 




4106 


Edwards Inc. 


Edward's 5, 10 and $1.00 
store 


Naval Base, SC 


$70,000 


4109 


Wentworth 
Realty 


Warehouse 


? 




4111 


Mr. & Mrs. A. 
Constantine 


residence 


St. Margaret and 
5th Street 


unexecuted 


4112 


Mr. Albert Orth 


Addition to Building 


125 Meeting 
Street 




4114 


Major J. D. E. 
Meyer 


New Office Building 


65-69 Broad 
Street 




? 


Pastime 
Amusement 


Proposed Theatre 


Race Street 


unexecuted 


? 


Pastime 
Amusement 


"King Street Theatre" 


King Street 


unexecuted 




U.S. 

Government 


Administration Building 


Navy Yard, SC 


$50,000 




U.S. 
Government 


Fire Station, Police 
Station and Gaurd House 


Navy Yard, SC 


$50,000 




U.S. 
Government 


Fire Station (Marine 
Barracks) 


Parns Island, SC 


$60,000 



78 





U.S. 
Government 


Branch Fire Station 


Navy Yard, SC 


$30,000 




U.S. 
Government 


Office Building for Labor 
Board and P.O. 


Navy Yard, SC 


$200,000 




Peter Botzis 


Store and Apartment 


Corner of 
Cleveland and 
Rutledge Avenue 




1942 1 




Albert Sottile 


two theatres 




$150,000 


4204 


Theatres Realty 
Company 


New Building 


? 




4265 


Haverty's 
Furniture 


New Store Building 


Corner of King 
and Wentworth 
Streets 






U.S. 
Government 


Post Exchange Service 
Barracks (Marine 
Barracks) 


Parris island, SC 


$40,000 




Albert Sottile 


St. Charles Apartments 


upper King 
Street 


$70,000 




Albert Sottile 


Apartment Building 






U.S. 
Government 


Nurses' Quarters 


Navy Yard, SC 


$80,000 




U.S. 
Government 


U.S. Engineering Dept. 


Florence, SC 


$4,000,000 


1943 1 


4345 


United Service 
Organizations, 
Inc. 


Alterations 


Walterboro, SC 






Mr. & Mrs. A. 
Constantine 


Residence 


201 Grove Street 




no# 


U.S. 
Government 


Proposed US Post Office 
Building 


Corner of 
Meeting and 
Hutson Streets 


unbuilt 



79 





U.S. 
Government 


War Trailer Project 


Moncks Corner, 
SC 


$35,000 




U.S. 
Government 


War Housing Project 


Beaufort, SC 


$135,000 




U.S. 
Government 


War Housing Project 


Moncks Corner, 
SC 


$85,000 




U.S. 
Government 


War Housing Project 


Charleston 


$18,000 




Kerrison's 

Department 

Store 


Alterations 


260 King Street 


$20,000 




Albert Sottile 


Repairs to various 
theaters 




$25,000 


1944 1 


4401 


Chas. Ship 
Building and Dry 
Dock Company 


Cafeteria 


Charleston 


$16,000 


4402 


United Service 
Organizations, 
Inc. 


Travelers Aid-Troops in 
Transit Lounge 


North Charleston 


$20,000 


4403 


United Service 
Organizations, 
Inc. 


Conversion to Dormitory 


George Street 




4404 


Meyer's Dress 
Shop 


Alterations 


315 King Street 




4405 


Zion 

Presbyterian 

Church 


Comfort Station 


123-125 Calhoun 
Street 




4405 


City of 
Charleston 


Marion Square Band 
Stand & Comfort Station 


Marion Square 


$15,000 


4406 


City of 
Charleston 


New Canteen and 
Information Center 


Marion Square 


unexecuted 
? 


4407 


Mr. And Mrs. 

William 

Lempesis 


Repairs to Basement 


849 Rutledge 
Avenue 




4408 


Mr. Speros 
Stella 


Alterations 


137 Calhoun 
Street 





80 



4410 


Lutheran 
Service Center 


New Service Center 


Vanderhorst 
Street 




4411 


Gas Engine & 

Electric 

Company 


Alterations 


280 Meeting 
Street 




4412 


Frank Taylor 


Alterations 


King Street 




4413 


Port City Bank 


Additions 


? 


unexecuted 


4415 


Mr. W, P. 
Poulnot 


Alterations, to Residence 


108 Tradd Street 




4416 


Washington 
Realty 


Chicco Apartments 


37 John Street 


$250,000 


4417 


St. Andrews 
Parish 


Fire Station 


St. Andrews 




4418 


Kerrison's 

Department 

Store 


Photo Studio, 3rd Floor 


260 King Street 




4419 


Legerton & Co. 


Alterations 


263 King Street 




4420 


My Shop of 
N. Y. 


Department Store 


248 King Street 


$45,000 


4421 


General Marine 
Supply Co. 
Building 


Alterations 


198 East Bay 
Street 




4422 


F. J. Martschink 
Company 


Additions 


14 Cumberland 
Street 




4423 


Mary Hawkins 


Alterations 


65-C Hasell 
Street 




4425 


Southern 
Jewelers 
Company 


New Building 


346 King Street 




1945 1 


4501 


Conklin's Style 
Shop 


Remodeling of Store 


unknown 





81 



4502 


Eastern Airlines 


Ticket Office Addition to 
the Francis Marion Hotel 


King Street 




4504 


Ebenezer A. M. 
E. Church 


New Church Building 


44 Nassau Street 




4505 


Mrs. Eva 
Cygielman 


Conversion of 
Apartments 


Ashley Avenue 
and Bull Street 




4508 


Charleston 
County 


New Health Center 


Courtenay Street 




4509 


Mr. Mitchell 
Robinson 


Conversion to 
Apartments 


53 S. Battery 
Avenue 




4512 


Greer Drug 
Company 


Alterations and Additions 


? 




4513 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Max Krawcheck 


Additions to Residence 


164SanSouci 
Street 




4514 


Little Town 


Remodeling of Building 


228 King Street 




4515 


Mr. St. Clair 
Orvin 


New Shop Building 


Moncks Corner, 
SC 




4516 


Grey Line Tours, 
Inc. 


New Office and Garage 
Building 


99 St. Philip 
Street 




4517 


James Island 
School District 


Riverland Terrace School 
Additions 


James Island 


unexecuted 


4518 


Schwerin 
Brothers 


New Building 


North Charleston 




4519 


Southern 

Wholesale 

Company 


Warehouse 


213 Meeting 
Street 


unexecuted 


4520 


United Service 
Organizations, 
Inc. 


Negro U. S. 0. Building 


President Street 




4521 


Sam's 
Haberdashery 


Store Front 


347 King Street 


unexecuted 


4522 


S & J Simowitz 


Marilyn's Shoe Store 


299 King Street 


$35,000 



82 



4523 


Dr. E. G. Gainey 


3rd Floor Conversion to 
Apartments 


149 Calhoun 
Street 




4524 


Gulf Fruit 
Company 


New Warehouse 


Whitevilie, NC 




4525 


Wentworth 
Realty Co. 


Shop Buildings 


1 & 3 Liberty 
Street 




4527 


Mr. And Mrs. P. 
A. Yatrelis 


Residence 


Summerville, SC 




4528 


Harry Miller 
Fashions 


Alterations 


86-C Wentworth 
Street 




4529 


Mangel's 


Department Store 


289 King Street 


$75,000 


4530 


Wentworth 
Realty Co. 


St. Philip Street Shops 


Corner of 
Wentworth and 
St. Philip Streets 




4531 


Mr. J. L. 
Peeckson 


Residence 


Hester and 
Pendleton Street 




4533 


Mr. And Mrs. G. 
S. Carter 


Residence 


? 


unexecuted 


4534 


C. B. Prentiss 
and Company 


Proposed New Building 


250 King Street 




4535 


Theatres Realty 


Store Building 


Market Street 




4536 


Mr. And Mrs. C. 
E. Gibson 


Additions to Residence 


Meggetts, SC 




4538 


Estate of Gussie 
Livingstain 


New Shop Building 


? 




4539 


A. G. Rhodes 

Furniture 

Company 


Alterations 


359 King Street 


unexecuted 


4541 


Mr. J. G. Sherrer 


Shop Building 


573 Meeting 
Street 


unexecuted 



83 



4542 


Mr. L. M. 
Copleston 


Doctor's Office Building 


? 




4544 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Mike Xidas 


Alterations to Residence 


809 Rutledge 
Avenue 


unexecuted 


4543 


Mr. Tom 
Schiadaressi 


Alterations 


90 Society Street 




4545 


Daughters of 
Israel Hall 


Alterations 


54 St. Philip 
Street 




4547 


Moskos Brothers 


New Building 


Columbus Street 




4548 


Quattlebaum 

Electric 

Company 


Alterations 


302 King Street 


unexecuted 




John P. Botzis 


Building 


139 Calhoun 
Street 






Mr. & Mrs. A. 
Constantine 


Alterations to Residence 


201 Grove Street 






Wentworth 
Realty Co. 


Alterations to building 


Rear of 297 King 
Street 






A.M.E. Church 


Additions 


Charleston 


$40,000 




Albert Sottile 


Various types of buildings 


This may include 
buildings from 
above 


$50,000 




Various Clients 


Various types of buildings 


This may include 
buildings from 
above 


$50,000 


1946 1 


4601 


Mr. J. Russel 
Williams 


Multiple Houses 


Moncks Corner, 
SC & Pinopolis, 
SC 


unexecuted 


4602 


Mrs. Shirley 
Prodosky 


Alterations to Building 


? 





84 



4604 


Mr. Emmett 
Johnson 


Conversion to 
Apartments 


Queen Street 




4606 


Mr. Louis 
Tanenbaum 


New Residence 


? 




4610 


Mr. W. P. 
Poulnot 


Kerrison's, Repairs and 
Additions 


260 King Street 


$25,000 


4612 


Mr. Kronsberg 


Edward's Store Building 


Navy Yard, SC 




4613 


Elite Theatre 


New Theatre Building 


635-637 King 
Street 


unexecuted 


4614 


Chase Furniture 
Company 


Store building 


414 King Street 


$50,000 


4615 


Bullwinkei's 
Bakery 


Repairs and Additions 


? 




4616 


Mr. And Mrs. J. 
J. Fabian 


Additions to Residence 


69 Sans Souci 
Street 




4617 


Mr.. And Mrs. J. 
J. Fabian 


New Beach House 


? 




4621 


Mr. E. A. Morris 


M & M Bowling Alley, 
Existing Building 


? 




4622 


Goulston 
Corporation 


Alterations to Building 


King and George 
Streets 


unexecuted 


4624 


Mrs. G. M. 
Forbes 


Layout of Office 


? 




4625 


Haverty 
Furniture 


Store building, repairs 
and remodeling 


294 King Street 


$45,000 


4626 


Dr. Stanley 
Karesh 


Layout of Dental Suite 


139 Calhoun 
Street 




4627 


National Cash 

Register 

Company 


Existing Building 


152 King Street 





85 



4628 


St. John's 
Lutheran Church 


New Parish House 


Charleston, 
possibly 
Archdale Street 




4629 


Mr. Frank 
Lawandale 


Remodeling and 
Additions 


456 Meeting 
Street 




4630 


Walter's 
Haberdashery 


Remodeling 


King Street 


unexecuted 


4631 


Mr. Frank Taylor 


Remodeling 


301 King Street 


$10,000 


4631 


Mr. Frank Taylor 


Parking Lot 


George Street 




4633 


Cowperthwaite, 

Inc. 


furniture store 


209-213 King 
Street 


$60,000 


4634 


Mr. & Mrs. T. E. 
Rabon 


New Beauty Salon, 3rd 
Floor 


260 King Street 




4635 


Max's Men's 
Store 


Alterations 


321 King Street 




4636 


Dr. and Mrs. L. 
E. Jenkins 


Residence 


111 1/2 

Wentworth 

Street 




4637 


St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church 


Additions 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




4638 


Mr. E. H. 
Poulnot, Jr. 


Additions to Residence 


71 Linwood 
Street 


unexecuted 


4639 


Mrs. Mary 
Pierson 


New Residence 


Beaufort, SC 




4640 


Charleston 

Mattress 

Company 


New Warehouse 


Spring Street 
Ext. 




4641 


Albert Sottile 


Proposed Home 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




4642 


Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel L. 
Roberts 


Residence 


Avondale 
Subdivision 





86 



4643 


Dr. W. C. 
McDoneld & Mr. 
E. V. Presson 


New Hotel 


Isle of Palms, SC 




4644 


Mr. Paul Gowder 


New Service Station 


North Charleston 


unexecuted 


4646 


Mr. and Mrs. 

John 

Tecklenberq 


Alterations to Residence 


Windemere 
Subdivision 




4647 


Mr. and Mrs. J. 
S. Cox 


Residence 


St. George, SC 




4648 


Albert Sottile 


St. Charles Apartments, 
Alterations 


upper King 
Street 


unexecuted 


4649 


Citizens and 
Southern 
National Bank 


Bank building, 
remodeling 


284 King Street 




4650 


Music Hall 


New Music Hall 


? 


unexecuted 


4651 


Mr. James 
Pappas 


Restaurant-Bus Station 


Yemassee, SC 


unexecuted 


4652 


Mr. and Mrs. J. 
S. Cox 


Residence 


St. George, SC 




4653 


James F. 
Condon & Sons 


Condon's Department 
Store, Alterations and 
Remodeling 


431 King Street 


$450,000 


4654 


Pastime 
Amusement 


American Theatre, 
Alterations 


446 King Street 




4656 


W. K. Britzis 


Tourist Camp 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




4657 


J. C. Long 


Apartment Building 


King and Warren 
Streets 




4658 


Mr. Salvadore 
Sottile 


Residence 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




4659 


J. F. C. Realty 
Company 


Alterations and Repairs 


425-429 King 
Street 





87 



4660 


Mr. Hyman 
Karesh 


Layout of Store Windows 


? 




4661 


Mr. J. G. Sherrer 


Office Layout 


573 Meeting 
Street 




4663 


Seigling Music 
House 


Remodeling 


243 King Street 


unexecuted 


4664 


Mrs. C. M. 
Jackis 


Conversion to Shop 


137 Calhoun 
Street 




4665 


Pinckney Carter 
Company 


Remodeling 


26 Broad Street 






H. W. Houghton 


Houghton's Appliance 
Store 




$18,000 


1947 1 


4701 


Mr. And Mrs. A. 
E. Constantine 


Landscaping 


201 Grove Street 




4702 


Condon 


Thomas Condon and 
Boatmates' Memorial 
Building 


? 




4703 


Tru-Ade Bottling 
Company 


New Building 


Cumberland 
Street 




4704 


Eugene Skinner 


Residence 


Gordon Street 




4705 


Pastime 
Amusement Co. 


Arcade Theatre and 
Shops 


1 Liberty Street 




4706 


James F. 
Condon & Sons 


New Building (Condon's 
Department Store) 


425-427 King 
Street 




4707 


Charleston 

Industrial 

Association 


Quonset Hut, Industrial 
Park 


? 




4708 


Francis Marion 
Hotel 


Remodeling of Coffee 
Shop Kitchen 


King Street 




4709 


Mr. 1. Hyman 


Multiple Buildings Project 


Corner of Ashley 
Avenue and 
Chisolm Streets 


unexecuted 



88 



4710 


Pastime 
Amusement 


Gloria Theatre, Additions 
to boiler room 


345 King Street 


unexecuted 


4711 


Pastime 
Amusement 


New Warehouse 


Beaufain Street 




4712 


Albert Sottile 


proposed Skating Rink 


unknown 
address 


not 
executed 


4712 


Pastime 
Amusement 


Majestic Theatre, interior 
alterations 


343 King Street 




4713 


Pastime 
Amusement 


Garden Theatre, seating 
plan 


371 King Street 




4714 


Charleston 

Industrial 

Association 


New Building, Stark 
Industrial Park 


? 




4715 


St. James 
Methodist 
Church 


Alterations 


Spring and 
Coming Streets 




4716 


Mr. And Mrs. 

William 

Anaqnos 


Remodeling Home 


547 Rutledge 
Avenue 




4717 


Theaters Realty 


Warehouse (Gloria 
Theatre) 


rear of 345 King 
Street 


$16,000 


4718 


Theaters Realty 


Warehouse (Garden 
Theatre) 


rear of 367-369 
King Street 


unexecuted 


4719 


Miss Maude 
Williams 


Remodeling of House 


Pinopolis, SC 


unexecuted 


4720 


Doughnut Shop 


Alterations and Repairs 


431 King Street 




4721 


Dr. Petro Botzis 


New Shop Group 


Tarpon Springs, 
FL 


unexecuted 


4722 


G. W. Kesslers 


Alterations 


341 King Street 




4723 


Theatres Realty 


Alterations and Additions 


1050-1054 King 
Street 


unexecuted 



89 



4724 


Mr. D. i. Thomas 


New Theatre Building 


? 


unexecuted 


4725 


Dr. and Mrs. W. 
H. Boylston 


Residence 


Edgewater Park? 




4726 


Pastime 
Amusement Co. 


New Office for Garden 
Theatre 


367-369 King 
Street 




4727 


Charleston 

Industrial 

Association 


Manufacturing Plant 


Charleston 


$100,000 


4728 


Mr. P. P. 
Leventis 


Proposed Arcade 
Building 


Calhoun Street 


unexecuted 


4729 


Charleston 
County 


Cooper River Memorial 
Library 


Dual Lane 




4730 


Ed Fleishman 
and Brothers 


Remodeling of Shop 


Fayetteville, NC 




4733 


Fort Sumter 
Chevrolet Co. 
Inc. 


New Used Car Lot 


620 King Street 




4734 


Mr. Santo 
Conventino 


Dry Cleaning Unit 


367 King Street 




4735 


Mr. And Mrs. W. 
H. Solomon 


Residence 


? 




4736 


Pastime 
Amusement? 


Cynthia Theatre 


84-84 1/2 

Wentworth 

Street 


unexecuted 


4737 


Mr. Morris Sokol 


Warehouse 


91-93 Reid 
Street 


unexecuted 


4738 


Mescons 


Remodeling 


372 King Street 


unexecuted 


4739 


Mr, Andrew 
Trapalis 


New Building 


Corner of Lucas 
and Mill Streets 




4740 


Dr. James E. 
Scott Jr. 


New Office Building 


McClellanville, 
SC 





90 



4741 


The Knights of 
Columbus 


Repairs to Roof 


143 Calhoun 
Street 


unexecuted 


4742 


Mr. Morris Sokol 


New Store Building 


535-537 King 
Street 


unexecuted 




Charleston 
County 


Health Center 


unexecuted 






Theaters Realty 


5 shops 


? 


$66,430 




Pastime 
Amusement Co. 


Extension to American 
Theater 


446 King Street 


$18,182 


1948 1 


4801 


Theatres Realty 
Company 


Alterations to Liberty 
Street Shops 


1 Liberty Street 




4802 


Grecian Society 
of Charleston 


Church Building 


28 Race Street 


unexecuted 


4803 


J. R. Siau 


Residence 


Georgetown, SC 


$30,000 


4804 


? 


Proposed Apartment 
Building 


North Corner of 
Grove and 9th 
Street 




4805 


Berkley County 


Office Building 


Berkley County 




4806 


Mr. Morris Sokol 


Housing Project 


? 


unexecuted 


4807 


Pastime 
Amusement 


Alterations to Arcade 
Theatre 


1 Liberty Street 




4808 


McClellanville 
Schools 


Alterations and Additions 


McClellanville, 
SC 




4809 


Board of 
Trustees 
Charleston 


Burke Industrial School 


207 President 
Street 


$246,388 


4810 


Chamber of 
Commerce 


(existing conditions) 
Addition, alterations 


50 Broad Street 


?unexecute 
d 



91 



4811 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Leon Patat 


Residence 


Palmetto Road 


unexecuted 


4812 


Globe Shoe 
Stores 


Alterations 


279 King Street 


unexecuted 


4813 


Worthmore Co. 
Inc. 


Alterations 


Corner of King 
and George 
Streets 




4814 


J. C. Long 


Residence 


Mt. Pleasant, 
Seaside 


$250,000 


4815 


Mrs. Ira 
Prystowski 


Residence 


Riverland 
Terrace 




4816 


Mr. W. G. Doran 


New Garage 


187 Grove Street 




4817 


Copleston's 
Klendry 


Remodeling Building 


573 Meeting 
Street 




4818 


Charleston 

Municiple 

Waterworks 


alterations 


14 George Street 




4819 


Meggett Public 
Schools 


Meggett White Grammar 
School, Additions 


Meggett, SC 




4820 


Dr. J. A. C. 
Jackson 


New Office Building 


86 Morris Street 


unexecuted 


4822 


Miss Bertha 
Levy 


Shop Building 


? 


unexecuted 


4823 


Martzchink 
Realty Company 


Proposed Apartment 
Building 


Simons Street 




4824 


Fort Sumter 
Chevrolet Co. 
Inc. 


Alterations 


182 Meeting 
Street 




4825 


Citizens and 
Southern 
National Bank 


Remodeling 


Broad Street 




4825 


Grecian Society 


New Community Center 


28 Race Street 





92 



4826 


Dr. Herman 
Needle 


Office Building 


16 Liberty Street 




1949 1 


4901 


Riviera Theatre 


Interior Alterations 


King Street 


unexecuted 


4902 


Mr. James F. 
Condon 


Alterations to Condon's 
Dept. Store: Freight 
Elevator 


431 King Street 


$15,000 


4903 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Navarro 


New Home 


? 




4903 


Wentworth 
Realty Co. 


Alterations 


SE Corner of 
King and Society 
Streets 




4904 


Wentvi/orth 
Realty Co. 


Alterations to Office 
Building 


S.E. Corner of 
King and Society 
Street 




4905 


Coney-Davies 
Lumber Co. 


Alterations 


150 East Bay 
Street 




4906 


Sidney Widelitz 


Residence 


St. George, SC 


$35,000 


4907 


Mr. And Mrs. D. 
K. Gionis 


Residence 


St. Margaret 
Street 


unexecuted 


4908 


Pastime 
Amusement 


New Ashley Theatre 
Building 


U.S. Hwy 17 


$75,000 


4909 


Coastal Butane 
Gas Corporation 


Facade for Office 
Building 


Summerville, SC 




4911 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Jermain H. 
Slocum 


Alterations and Additions 


22 Lambol Street 




4912 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Edward Hill 


Alterations to Residence 


St George, SC 




4913 


Madren Paint 
Company 


New Store Front 


? 




4914 


George Bazakas 


Residence 


Summerville, SC 


$40,000 



93 



4915 


Miserendino 
Motor Co. 


Auto Garage & Display 


Charleston 


$35,000 


4916 


Copleston's 
Klendry 


Additions 


537 Meeting 
Street 


$25,000 


4917 


? 


Proposed Houses 


Tarpon Spnngs, 
PL 




4918 


Mr. & Mrs. W. F. 
Condon Sr. 


Residence 


Gordon Street 




4919 


North 

Charleston 

Lands 


Additions 


North Charleston 




4920 


Paul Motor 
Company 


Alterations to Fa?ade 


149 Meeting 
Street 




4921 


Pastime 
Amusement 


Garden Theatre 
Additions 


371 King Street 


$15,000 


4922 


Citizens and 
Southern 
National Bank 


Parking Lot 


544 King Street 


$10,000 


4924 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Hugh Lane 


Additions to Residence 


21 Council Street 




4925 


William B. Reily 
Co., Inc 


New Warehouse 


? 




4926 


Adolph 
Rodenburg 


Supermarket 


Corner of 
Rutledge & 
Strawberry Lane 


$125,000 


4927 


Citizens and 
Southern 
National Bank 


Existing Conditions? 


544 King Street 




4928 


Van Smith 
Building 
Materials Co. 


alterations 


276 East Bay 
Street 


$15,000 


4929 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Earl Senter 


New Motel 


U.S. Hwy 17 




4930 


Mr. William 
Pearlman 


Duplex Apartments 


S. W. Corner of 
Grove and 10th 
Streets 





94 



4931 


Dr. Peter Gazes 


Office Building 


696 Rutledge 
Avenue 




4932 


Adolph 
Rodenburg 


Supermarket 


U.S. Hwy 17 




4933 


St. James 
Methodist 
Church 


School building & 
auditorium 


James Island, 
SC 


$80,000 


4934 


Jack White 


Residence 


James Island, 
SC 


$35,000 


4935 


Pastime 
Amusement 


Alterations 


93 Society Street 




4936 


Palace Realty 
Company 


New Store Building 


560 King Street 


$30,000 


4938 


Edward 
Kronsberg 


Residence, Now the 
Citadel Alumni House 


91 Hagood 
Avenue 


$60,000 


4939 


Economy Oil 


Building 


5 Exchange 
Street 




4940 


Levy's Drug 
Store 


? 


Charleston 






Wentworth 
Realty Co. 


alterations 


Wentworth and 
King 


$15,000 




Wm. B. Riley 
Co. 


Coffee Roasting Plant 


Charleston 


$125,000 




Altman Cadillac 
Co. 


Auto Garage & Display 


Charleston 


$70,000 


1950 1 


5001 


St. Luke's A. M. 
E. Church 


Proposed Recreation 
Building 


St. Philip Street 


$60,000 


5002 


McClellanville 

Methodist 

Church 


Alteration to Sunday 
School 


McClellanville, 
SC 


$10,000 


5003 


Palace Theatre 


New Fan House 


? 





95 



5003 


Matthew 
Condon 


Entrance Gateway to 
Tanglewood Estate 


? 




5005 


Sacred Heart 
Church 


Addition to school 
building and New 
Auditorium 


888 King Street 


$50,000 


5006 


Seaboard Gas 
Company & The 
Charleston Oil 
Company 


New Building 


King Street 
Extension 




5007 


Maxwell 
Brothers and 
Hall 


Alterations 


360 King Street 




5008 


China Hall 


Alterations 


306 King Street 




5009 


Thomas W. 
Connally 


Alterations and Additions 
to Home 


Atlanta, GA 




5011 


Rodenburg's 
Supermarket 


New Parking Lot Layout 


Cannon and 
President Street 




5012 


Charleston 
Sheet Metal and 
Roofing Works 


Alterations and Additions 


Hayne Street 




5013 


H. A. Molony 


New Home 


Peachtree and 
Peidmont Streets 


$30,000 


5014 


Carroll Rivers 


Stores and Offices 


Byrnes Downs 
Subdivision 




5015 


Gus Martschink 


Ice Cream Parlor 


Rutledge Avenue 
and Strawberry 


$10,000 


5017 


John's Island 
School District 


New "colored" school 
building 


John's Island, SC 


$60,000 


5019 


Leon's Men's 
Wear 


Shop Building 


495-497 King 
Street 




5020 


Jack Eades 


New Home 


Savannah Hwy 




5021 


Purity Ice Cream 
Company 


New Building 


U. S. Hwy 78 





96 



5022 


George Stout 


Alterations to Rear 
Dwelling 


68-A Ashley 
Avenue 




5023 


La Brasca 


Alterations and Additions 


975 King Street 




5024 


Demitrio Vega 


Multi-Unit Building 


73 Alexander 
Street 




5025 


Pastime 
Amusement 


Alterations to Arcade 
Theatre 


1 & 3 Liberty 
Street 


$10,000 


5026 


Hardeeville 
School District 


"Consolidated Colored 
School" New Building 


Hardeeville, SC 


$150,000 


5027 


Charleston 
Home 


Conversion to 
Community Center 


? 




5028 


Wentworth 
Realty Co. 


alterations 


rear of 297 King 
Street 




5029 


Sullivan's Island 
School District 


New Auditorium and 
Cafeteria 


Sullivan's Island, 
SC 


$25,000 


5030 


Charleston 
Country Club 


Interior Alterations 


? 




5031 


J. F. C. Realty 
Co. 


Alterations to Condon's 
North 


431 King Street 


$25,000 


5033 


William M. Bird 
Company 


"Acres of Diamonds 
Exhibit" 






5034 


McKethan Olds. 
Co. 


Auto Garage & Display 


652 King Street 


$50,000 


5035 


Mr. Frank 
Lawandale 


New Building 


456 Meeting 
Street 




5036 


Edward's 


Additions 


Navy Yard, SC 


$30,000 


5038 


Mall Playground 
Field House 


New Building 


? 





97 



5039 


Mr. Kronsberg 


Alterations to Home 


91 Hagood 
Street 




5040 


Blessed 

Sacrament 

Parish 


New Building 


U. S. Hwy 17 




5041 


George C. 
Creighton, Jr. 


Alterations and Additions 


104 Rutledge 
Avenue 




5042 


Emmanuel 
A.M.E. Church 


Alterations 


Calhoun Street 




5043 


Ravenel School 
District 


Additions to Graded 
School Building 


Ravenel, SC 


$25,000 


5044 


Appel Furniture 


Additions and Alterations 


565 King Street 




5045 


J. C. Long 


New Office Building 








A. W. Allison 


Residence 




$25,000 




Dr. Peter Botzis 


Drug Store Building 


Naval Base, SC 


$20,000 


1951 1 


5101 


Pastime 
Amusement 


Gloria Theatre, 
Alterations to George St. 
Entrance 


371 King Street 




5102 


Mr. & Mrs. Harry 
Levinson 


Alterations to Elsa 
Shoppe 


331 King Street 




5103 


Conressman 
and Mrs. L. 
Mendel Rivers 


Home 


Charleston 


$85,000 


5104 


J.C. Long 


Office Building 


Savannah, GA 


$500,000 


5105 


S. Welch 


New Residence 


? 




5106 


Mr. Aaron 
Solomon 


New Residence 


Huger and 
Parkwood 
Streets 





98 



5107 


McAlister Realty 
Co. 


Store building 


343 King Street 


$35,000 


5108 


7 


Proposed New Medical 
Building 


? 




5109 


St. John's 
School District 
#9 


New "Colored" High 
School 


John's Island 


$200,000 


5110 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


New Building for the 
Society Corner School 


James Island, 
SC 


$180,000 


5111 


Carabatsos & 
Trapelis Building 


Alterations 


N. E. Corner of 
Rutledge Avenue 
& Bull Street 




5112 


Central Drug 
Store 


Alterations 


286 Meeting 
Street 




5113 


Max Krawcheck 


Apt & shop building 


58 George Street 


$30,000 


5114 


St. Angela 
Academy 


New School Building 


Aiken, SC 


$200,000 


5115 


Dorothy Ayers 


shop & apartments 


75 Hasell Street 


$25,000 


5116 


Daisy Bogin 


Dress Shop 


Myrtle Beach 


$30,000 


5117 


Emanuel A. M. 
E. Church 


Crypt for the Remains of 
Rev. L. Ruffin Nichols 


Calhoun Street 




5118 


Rosilind Realty 
Company 


Shopping Center, New 
Ashley Theatre 


U. S. Hwy 17 






R.L Kerr 


shop building 




$12,500 


1952 1 


5201 


Palace Realty 
Company 


New Store Building 


561 King Street 




5202 


Belk-Robinson 
Company 


New Store Front 


232 King Street 


$15,000 



99 



5203 


Kerrison's 


alterations 


260 King Street 


$16,000 


5204 


Condon's 


Alterations-north building 


431 King Street 


$15,000 


5205 


The Home 
Federal Savings 
and Loan 


New Fa9ade 


39 Broad Street 




5206 


James Island 
School Board 


W. Gresham Meggett 
School additions 


James Island, 
SC 


$157,999 


5207 


Albert Sottile 


New Building 


Society Street 




5208 


Citizens and 
Southern 
National Bank 


Rehabilitation of Building 


10 Elliott Street 




5209 


Albert Sottile 


Remodeling 


208 King Street 




5210 


Wentworth 
Realty Co. 


New Shop Building 


84-84 1/2 

Wentworth 

Street 




5211 


Bishop J.J. 
Russell 


New School Building and 
Convent, Blessed 
Sacrament Parish 




$175,000 


5212 


St. John's 
School District 
#9 


Additions, Haut Gap 
School 


John's Island 




5213 


Mr. Ketas 


Remodeling Store Front, 
King's Restaurant 


337 King Street 




5214 


Bluffton School 
District #2 


Gymnasium 


Bluffton, SC 




5215 


Orphan's 

Vocational 

School 


Workshop 


? 




5216 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Proposed New "White" 
High School Building 


James Island, 
SC 




5217 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Edward P. 
Huguenin, Jr. 


New Home 


Ridgeland, SC 





100 



5218 


Condon's 


alterations 


431 King Street 


$50,000 


5219 


? 


New Store Building 


Corner of King 
and Fulton 
Streets 




5220 


Charleston, 
School Board 


Burke Industrial School 
additions 


207 President 
Street 


J, 


5221 


Masonic Temple 


Danzler Lodge 318 


? 




5222 


St. John's 
School District 
#9 


New School Building, 
Rockville Elementary 


John's Island 




5223 


Dr. Petro Botzis 


New Home 


Crescent 
Subdivision 




5224 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Central Graded School, 
new building 


Edisto Island, SC 




5225 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Rantowles Graded 
School 


Rantowles, SC 




5226 


Barshay's 

Department 

Store 


Alterations and Additions 


Summerville, SC 




5227 


Hardeeville 
School District 


Additions, "Consolidated 
Colored School" 


Hardeeville, SC 




5228 


Pendleton 
Realty Co. 


U.S. Post Office 


North 
Charleston, SC 


$45,000 


5229 


Condon's 


alterations 


431 King Street 


$50,000 


5230 


Belk-Robinson 
Company 


Details of Parkway 
Entrance 


Market Street 




5231 


Edward's Realty 
Company 


New Front 


Naval Base, SC 




5232 


? 


Hospital and Training 
School for Nurses 


Cannon Street 





101 



5233 


John McAlister, 
Inc. 


Funeral Director 


169 Meeting 
Street 




5234 


Bishop J.J. 
Russell 


School Plant and Church 
Building 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 


S95,000 




St. Paul's 
School District 


School building 


Edisto Island, SC 


$150,000 




Garden Theatre 


ironwork 


371-373 King 
Street 






Gloria Theatre 


ironwork 


329 King Street 






Plantation 
Restaurant 


ironwork 


10 Liberty Street 






Riviera Theatre 


ironwork 


225-227 King 
Street 






Junior League 
Speech School 


school 


? No address on 
plans 


$20,000 




Charleston 
School Board 


school building 


This could be 
#5206 or #52 16 


$511,000 


1953 


5301 


Courtenay 
School 


New School Building 


Corner of 
Meeting Mary 
Streets 




5302 


U.S. 
Government? 


School and Convent 


Naval Base, SC 




5303 


Blessed 

Sacrament 

School 


Alterations and Additions 


U. S. Hwy 17 




5303 


Boy Scouts 


Health Building for Boy 
Scout Camp 


Charleston 
County 




5304 


Mr. H. L 
Saltonstall 


Conversion to 
Apartments 


4 Courthouse 
Square 




5304 


Calhoun Super 
Service Station 


Building 


SW Corner of 
Meeting and 
Calhoun Streets 





102 



5305 


Mr. And Mrs. W, 
R. Condon, Jr. 


New Beach House 


Sullivan's Island, 
SC 




5306 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Klugh Purdy 


Alterations to Garage 


Ridgeland, SC 




5306 


James F. 
Condon and 
Sons 


Details of Escalators, 
North Store 


431 King Street 




5307 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


School District 
Superintendent's Office 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$15,084 


5308 


Charleston 
County School 
Board 


Burke Industrial School, 
Auditorium 


207 President 
Street 




5309 


James F. 
Condon and 
Sons 


Condon's Apartment 
Building 






5310 


Jean Meyer 


Remodeled Store Front, 
Jean Meyer Dress Shop 


315 King Street 




5311 


P. A. Yatrelis 


Alterations and Additions 


Summerville, SC 




5312 


Catholic 
Seminary 


Gateway 


Aiken, SC 




5313 


Charleston 
County Board of 
Education 


Office Layout 


Charleston 
County 




5314 


Jasper County 
Board of 
Trustees 


Jasper County "Negro" 
High School 


Ridgeland, SC 


$417,000 


5315 


Jasper County 
Board of 
Trustees 


Coosawhatchie 
Elementary School 


Coosawhatchie, 
SC 




5316 


Jasper County 
Board of 
Trustees 


Hardeeville Consolidated 
"Negro Elementary" 
School, Additions 


Hardeeville, SC 




5317 


G.L. Nungezer 


Additions and Alterations 
to Bayview Plantation 


James Island, 
SC 


$15,027 


5318 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


W. Gresham Meggett 
School additions 


James Island, 
SC 





103 



5319 


J. C. Penney 


Renovations to Marks 
Building 


SE Corner of 
King and 
Calhoun Streets 




5320 


Jasper County 
Board of 
Trustees 


Additions and 
Renovations, Robertville 
Elementary School 


Robertville, SC 




5321 


Jasper County 
Board of 
Trustees 


Additions and 
Renovations, Ellis 
Community Elementary 
School 


Ellis Community, 
SC 




5322 


Jasper County 
Board of 
Trustees 


Additions and 
Renovations, Jasper 
County Elementary 
School 


Ridgeland, SC 




5323 


Jasper County 
Board of 
Trustees 


Additions and 
Renovations, Good Hope 
Elementary School 


Good Hope 
Community, SC 




5324 


James Island 
School Board 


James Island High 
School additions 


James Island, 
SC 


$56,524 


5325 


Charleston 
County Council 


Renovation of Offices 


Old Citadel, 
Marion Square 




5326 


Charleston 
County Police 


Alterations to Offices 


Old Citadel, 
Marion Square 




5327 


Charleston 
County Council 


County Hall Alterations 


1000 King Street 


$10,211 


5328 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Gene M. 
McNulty 


Proposed Motel 


St. George, SC 




5329 


St. Andrews 
Village 


? 






5330 


Charleston 
School District 
#20 


New "White" Elementary 
School 




$400,000 


5331 


John McAlister, 
Inc. 


Alterations 


169 Meeting 
Street 





104 



5332 


Our Lady of the 
Valley Convent 


Alterations and Additions 


Aiken, SC 






St. John's Board 
of Trustees 


school building 


Rockville, SC 


$150,000 


1954 1 


5401 


Southern 

Broadcasting 

Co. 


TV Building 




$156,127 


5402 


? 


Proposed Shop Building 


St. Andrews 

Village, 

Charleston 




5403 


My Shop, Inc. 


Shop 


Liberty Street 




5404 


Adolph 
Rodenberg 


New Home 


Charleston 
County 




5405 


James Island 
School Board 


Cut Bridge Elementary 
School (Murray LaSaine) 


James Island, 
SC 


$192,000 


5406 


The Pinecrest 
#12 


House 


? 




5407 


Mr. And Mrs. 

Lamar 

Murdauqh 


New Home 


Valdosta, GA 


Plans w/ 
EAC 


5408 


Blessed 

Sacrament 

Parish 


Proposed Recreation 
Pavilion 


U. S. Hwy 17 




5409 


Rodenburg's 

Supermarkets, 

Inc. 


warehouse 


U. S. Hwy 52 


$201,356 


5410 


Henry Salerni 


Store (cleaners and 
tailors) 


Naval Base, SC 


$43,890 


5411 


Bishop J.J. 
Russell 


Sacred Heart Auditorium 


888 King Street 


$43,890 


5412 


St. John's 
School District 
#9 


Mt. Zion "Negro" 
Elementary School 


John's Island, SC 




5413 


LaBrasca's 
Motel 


New Motel 


King and 

Cleveland 

Streets 





105 



5414 


Ralph R. 
Coleman, T. 
Allen Legare, 
Jack White, et. 
Al. 


Office Building 


Corner of Bull 
Street and 
Ashley Avenue 




5415 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Riverland Terrace School 
Addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$30,299 


5416 


Dr. R.M. Pauling 
& Dr. Clay Evatt 


Office Building 


91 Rutledge 
Avenue 




5417 


Mrs. Mary King 


House 






5418 


Charleston 
County Council 


Law Office, 2nd Floor 


109 Church 
Street 




5419 


R. L. Walker 


Walker Shopping Center 


Georgetown, SC 




5420 


U.S. 
Government 


Additions to Depot 
School 


Parris Island, SC 


$40,000 


5421 


Awendaw 
School District 
#1 


Awendaw Graded 
School, addition of new 
heating room 


Awendaw, SC 




5422 


Albert Sottile 


Corona Theatre 


Society Street 


unexecuted 
? 


5423 


Dr. and Mrs. 
Gazes 


Additions to Home 


Country Club 

Estates, 

Charleston 




5424 


? 


Joyner Motor Court 


Georgetown, SC 




5425 


Edward's Inc. 


Edward's 5, 10 and $1.00 
store 


Beaufort, SC 


$100,000 


5426 


Bishop J.J. 
Russell 


Sacred Heart Church 
Rectory additions 


888 King Street 


$12,000 


5427 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Sam Trakas 


New Home 


Columbia, SC 





106 



5428 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Baptist Hill Elementary 
School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$139,945 


5430 


U.S. 
Government? 


Marine Corps Theatre 
Building 


Parris Island, SC 




5431 


? 


St. Peter's Gym and 
Auditorium 


Columbia, SC 




5432 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


2 classroom addition to 
J.I. Grade School 


James Island, 
SC 


$10,155 


1955 1 


5501 


Hughes Motors, 
Inc. 


Warehouse 






5502 


Hughes Motors, 
Inc. 


Renovations of Building 
Occupied by Crane 
Company 






5503 


W. T. Grant 


Store building 
(Renovations or 
Alterations?) 


SE Corner of 
King and 
Calhoun Streets 




5504 


George M. 
Hughes 


Housing Project 


Meeting Street 
Road 




5505 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


J.I. Elementary School 


James Island, 
SC 


$125,000 


5506 


Wappetaw 

Presbyterian 

Church 


New Church Building 


McClellanville, 
SC 




5507 


W. F. Condon 


Proposed Motel 


Rutledge Avenue 
and Vanderhorst 
Street 


unexecuted 
? 


5508 


Elks Home, 
Lodge # 242 


New Home for BPOE 
Lodge #242 






5509 


St John's School 
District #9 


Mt. Zion Elementary 
School 


John's Island, SC 


$116,408 


5510 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Miley Hill Elem. School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$140,061 


5512 


W. F. Condon 


Guest House 


Sullivan's Island, 
SC 





107 



5513 


Mr. And Mrs. 

Joseph 

Miklaszewski 


House 


Jamestown, SC 




5514 


Mr. And Mrs. 

George 

Nungezer 


Additions and Alterations 
to Home 


E. Battery and 
Council Streets 




5515 


Baker's 

Memorial 

Hospital 


Proposed Kitchen and 
Eating Facilities 






5516 


Mr. M. C. Wilson 


New Home 


Seabrook, SC 




5517 


Dr. and Mrs. 
Siau 


Additions to Home 


Georgetown, SC 




5518 


Fellowship 
Society 


Renovations 


370 King Street 




5519 


Our Lady Queen 
of Peace School 


New School Building 


N. Augusta, GA 




5520 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


J.I. High school addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$56,524 


5521 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Patat 


Additions to Residence 


Wappoo Heights 
Subdivision 




5522 


St. James- 
Santee School 
District #1 


Additions to St. James 
High School and 
Elementary School 


McClellanville, 
SC 




5523 


St. James- 
Santee School 
District #1 


New "Negro" Santee 
Elementary School 


McClellanville, 
SC 


$88,985 


5524 


Stella Maris 
Parish 


New Auditorium 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




5525 


Sam Berlin 


Addition to Residence 


38 Murray Blvd. 




5526 


Joseph P. Riley 


Proposed Shop and 
Office Building 


161 Calhoun 
Street 




5527 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


W. Gresham Meggett 
School additions 


James Island, 
SC 





108 



5528 


St. Luke A. M. 
E. Church 


Alterations and Additions 


St. Philip Street? 




5529 


Charleston 
County Jail 


Additions 


? 




5530 


Mr. And Mrs. 
James Genaris 


Shop Building 


Savannah Hwy 






James Island 
School District 
#3 


Cut Bridge Eiem. School 


James Island, 
SC 


$64,185 


1956 


5601 


S.C Highway 
Department, 
Motor Vehicle 
Division 


? 


Charleston 
County 




5602 


H. K. Purdy 


Shopping Center 


Ridgeland, SC 




5603 


Friedman's 
Jewelers 


Alterations 


295 King Street 




5604 


St. John's 
School District 
#9 


St. John's Elementary, 
Additions & Cafeteria 


John's Island, SC 


$105,443 


5605 


St. John's 
School District 
#9 


Addition Haupt Gap 
School 


John's Island, SC 


$30,769 


5606 


Dr. J. S. Howell 


Office Building 


Charleston 
County 




5607 


Mrs. G. L 
Hockmeyer, Sr. 


Proposed Rodenberg's 
Market 


Rutledge Avenue 
and Sumter 
Street 




5608 


H. Steeken & 
Co. 


Warehouse & garage 




$15,449 


5610 


Anne's Shop 


Alterations to Facade 


312 King Street 




5611 


M. William 
Frampton 


Additions 


20 Colonial 
Street 





109 



5612 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Murray La Saine (Cut 
Bridge) Elementary 
School cafeteria 


James Island, 
SC 


$32,000 


5613 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


J.I. Elementary School 
cafeteria 


James Island, 
SC 


350,000 


5615 


North 

Charleston 

Methodist 


Educational Building 


North 
Charleston, SC 




5616 


Carroll B. Rivers 


Building? 


Byrnes Downs 
Subdivision 




5617 


University of 
Georgia 


Marine Biology Lab 


Sapelo Island, 
GA 


$60,000 


5618 


Mrs. Judith 
Solomon 


Cannon Shoe Store 
alterations 


252 King Street 


$27,286 


5620 


Harold Petit 


Home 


Fenwick Dnve 




5621 


McClennan 
Banks Memorial 
Hospital 


New Hospital 


Courtenay Dnve 




5622 


McAlister's 

Undertaking 

Parlor 


New Building 


150 Wentworth 
Street 


$166,777 


5623 


Mr. And Mrs. R. 
H. Robertson 


Motel 


Savannah Hwy 




5624 


J. C. Long 


Alterations and Additions 


10 Court House 
Square 




5625 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Sugar Hill Elementary 
School (Minnie Hughes) 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$175,000 


5626 


Copleston's 
Klendry 


Rug Cleaning 
Department? 


573 Meeting 
Street 


$50,000 


5627 


W. F. Condon 


Nightclub 


? 




5628 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Classroom Additions 


James Island, 
SC 





110 





Jasper County 
School District 
#1 


Jasper Co. Elem. School 


Ridgeland, SC 


S229.000 




Jasper County 
School District 
#1 


Coosawhatchie Elem. 
School 


Coosawhatchie, 
SC 


$144,295 


1957 1 


5701 


John D. Holmes 


Shopping Center 


James Island 




5702 


Joe Bessinger 


Piggy Park Drive Inn 


Dorchester Road 




5703 


St. Peters 
Catholic Church 


Auditorium 


Beaufort, SC 




5704 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Baptist Hill H.S. Addition 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$75,000 


5705 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Jane Edwards Elem. 
Addition 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$20,000 


5706 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Baptist Hill Elementary 
School Addition 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$20,000 


5707 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Mile Hill Elementary 
Addition 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$20,000 


5708 


J. Mitchell 
Graham 


House 






5709 


John Larry 


Pavilion 


Folly Beach, SC 


$35,000 


5710 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


New White High School 
Building 


James Island, 
SC 




5710- 
A 


J.C. Long 


Office Building 


Savannah, GA 


$400,000 


5711 


St. John's 
School District 
#9 


Alterations, St. John's 
High School 


Johns Island, SC 




5712 


St. John's 
School District 
#9 


Alterations, St. John's 
High School 


Johns Island, SC 





111 



5713 


St. James- 
Santee School 
District #1 


Cafeteria for Elem. & 
H.S. 


McClellanville, 
SC 


$100,000 


5714 


Hay Oil 
Company 


Parking Center 






5715 


St. James- 
Santee School 
District #1 


New Santee Elementary 
School 


McClellanville, 
SC 


$65,000 


5716 


? 


Proposed Domestic 
Relations Court [The 
Center](Entry is illegible) 


Charleston? 




5717 


Kerrison's 


Parking Lot 


260 King Street 




5718 


Franke Home 


?Dormitory (Nursing 
Home) 


Calhoun Street 


$75,000 


5719 


Charleston 
County 


Curbing and Sign Pylon, 
County Hall 


1000 King Street 




5720 


Arcade Theatre 
and Shops 


Alterations 


1 & 3 Liberty 
Street 




5721 


Albert Sottile 


? 


173 Rutledge 
Avenue 




5722 


Dr. G. Creighton 
Frampton 


Additions to Home 


Orange Street 




5723 


J. C. Long 


Office Building 


Savannah, GA 




5724 


Moultrie School 
District #2 


Moultrie Jr. High School 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




5725 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


James Island (White) 
High School, 8 
Classroom Addition 


James Island, 
SC 




5726 


Dr. and Mrs. J. 
Hugh Jackson 


Home 


? 




5727 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Addition Riverland 
Terrace Elementary 
School 


James Island, 
SC 


$10,935 


5728 


William S. 
Pearlman 


Apartments 







112 



5729 


John's Island 
School District 


Shop Building for Haupt 
Gap School 


John's Island. SC 




5730 


Hardeeville 
School District 


Heating Plan 


Hardeeville. SC 




5731 


Moultrie School 
District #2 


Mamie P. Whiteside 
Elem. School 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 


S53.907 


5732 


Unitarian 
Church 


Rectory 


Ashley Avenue 
and Murray Blvd. 


535,000 


1958 


5801 


C. 0. Thompson 


Apartment Building 


NE Corner of St 
Philip and 
Vanderhorst 
Streets 




5802 


Kerrison's 


Remodeling 


260 King Street 




5803 


? 


West Oak Shopping 
Center 


Charleston 




5804 


Wm. F, Condon, 
Sr. 


12 Unit Apartment 
Building 


Corner of 
Rutledge & 
Vanderhorst 


$108,229 


5805 


Triest & Sholk 
Agents 


Shop Building 


305 King Street 


322,201 


5806 


Bishop J.J. 
Russell 


Bishop England School 
Addition 


Calhoun Street 


577,500 


5807 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


St. Paul's H.S. Rehab. 


Younge's Island 
SC 


571.401 


5808 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Mollis A. Ayers 


Motel, King Charles Motel 


Hasell and 
Meeting Streets 




5809 


Lafayette Motel 


Motel 


Savannah Hwy 




5810 


Marrion's 
Cafeteria 


? 


Savannah. GA 




5811 


Moultrie School 
District #2 


4 Classroom Addition 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 





113 



5812 


Ashley Hall 
Trustees 


New Dormitory 


172 Rutledge 
Avenue 


$100,000 


5813 


J.C. Long 


Add. U.S. ENG. BLDG 


Savannah, GA 


$260,608 


5814 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Addition St. Paul's H.S. 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$66,656 


5815 


Moultrie School 
District #2 


Mt. Pleasant Academy, 6 
classroom addition 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 


$55,022 


5816 


John's island 
School District 
#9 


Mt. Zion Elementary 
School Addition 


John's Island, SC 


$11,177 


5817 


John's Island 
School District 
#9 


John's Island Elementary 
School Addition 


John's Island, SC 


$49,792 


5818 


Peter Botzis 


Remodeling of [Bay] 
Walgreen Drug Store 


? 






James Island 
School District 
#3 


James Island High 8 
classroom addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$60,945 




St. John's 
School District 
#9 


St. John's H.S. 
Rehabilitation 


John's Island, SC 


$62,990 


1959 1 


5901 


Mr. P.M. Furris 


Shop Buildings 


308-310 King 
StrPPt 




5902 


Wm. F. Condon, 
Sr. 


12 Unit Apartment 
Building 


Corner of 
Rutledge & 
Vanderhorst 


$108,229 


5903 


Palmetto 

Construction 

Company 


Office Building 


Charleston 




5904 


Francis Marion 
Hotel 


[Dec] Ball Room 


King Street 




5905 


Alex Tumboli 


Apartment Building 


7 Logan Street 




5905 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Allison Seigling 


Apartment Building 


29 George Street 





114 



5906 


Murray Silver 


Motel 


Savannah, GA 




5907 


Mrs, Rachel C. 
Shogry 


Home 


Greenbriar Lane 


$30,733 


5908 


Isle of Palms 
School District 


Isle of Palms Elementary 
School 


Isle of Palms, SC 




5909 


Dr. Peter Botzis 


Home 


1803 Darthmoor 
Circle 


$39,820 


5910 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Harbor View Elementary 
School 


James Island, 
SC 


$172,296 


5911 


B.L. Solomon & 
Israel H. 
Jacobson 


New Office Building 


34 George Street 




5912 


Knight's of 
Columbus 


Proposed Alterations to 
Basement 


Calhoun Street 




5913 


Moultrie School 
District #2 


Laing High School Locker 
and Shower Room 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 


$10,344 


5914 


Dorchester- 
Waylyn Baptist 
Church 


Educational Building 
Wando Woods Baptist 
Church 


North 
Charleston, SC 


$66,958 


5915 


? 


Building 


34 George Street 


unexecuted 


5916 


? 


Doctor's Office Building 


Fairfield, Conn 




5917 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Addition to W. Grisban 
Meggett High School 


James Island, 
SC 




5918 


U.S. Department 
of Agriculture 


Proposed Building 


Raleigh, NC 




5919 


Klyde Roberson 


Manufacturing Plant 


Charleston 




5920 


Midas Muffler 
Shop 


Additions 


2036 Meeting 
Street 





115 





North 

Charleston 

Methodist 


1-95 trucking station 


North 
Charleston, SC 


$190,055 


1960 1 


6001 


Francis Marion 
Hotel 


Swamp Fox Room 


King Street 




6002 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Louis Garfield 


Apartment Building 


Grove Street 




6003 


John 
Chrysostone 


Building 


Folly Beach, SC 




6004 


Beaufort Baptist 
Church 


Building 


Beaufort, SC 




6005 


Folly beach 

Methodist 

Church 


Educational Building 


Folly Beach, SC 




6006 


Pepsi- Cola 

Bottling 

Company 


Bottling Plant 


Monck's Corner, 
SC 


$125,000 


6007 


Dr. Herman 
Austrian and 
Associates 


Doctors' Office Building 


Trumbull, Conn 




6008 


Masonic Temple 


Building 


145 St. Philip 
Street 




6009 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Alwyn Berlin 


Home 


Charleston 




6010 


The Mather 
School 


Dormitory, Gym and 
Library 


Beaufort, SC 


$234,000 


6011 


Garden Road 
Church of the 
Nazarene 


Sunday School Building 


SC Hwy 61 and 
Ashley Hall Road 




6012 


Elks Club 


Additions 






6013 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Walter Bulrow 


Home 


Broughton 
Avenue 




6014 


Berlin Brothers 


Building 


Corner of Broad 
and King Streets 




6015 


Fielding Funeral 
Home 


Mortuary 


Corner of 
Meeting Street 
and Jacksonville 


$50,000 



116 



6016 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Addition to Grisban 
Meggett Elementary 
School 


James Island 




6017 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Two Classroom Addition 
King's Highway 
Elementary School 


James Island, 
SC 




6018 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Two Classroom Addition 
Murray La Saine School 


James Island, 
SC 




6019 


Dorchester- 
Waylyn Baptist 
Church 


Educational Building 


Charleston 
Heights, SC 




6020 


Beaufort School 
District 


Additional Facilities for 
Mather School 


Beaufort, SC 




6021 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Two Classroom Addition 
Minnie Hughes 
Elementary School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 




6022 


St. James- 
Santee School 
District #1 


Alterations to Santee E. 
"Negro" School 


McClellanville, 
SC 




6023 


St. James- 
Santee School 
District #1 


Two Classroom Addition 
Porcher Elementary 
School 


Awendaw, SC 




6024 


St. James- 
Santee School 
District #1 


Two Classroom Addition 
to Lincoln School 


McClellanville, 
SC 




1961 J 


6101 


Elks Club 


Addition 


Charleston 


$62,742 


6102 


Charleston 
County School 
Board 


King's Hwy Elementary 
School, 8 Classroom 
Addition 


James Island 


$73,860 


6103 


Mescon's 


? 


Morrison Blvd 
and Huger Street 


$50,000 


6104 


Coastal 
Trailways 


Charleston terminal 


Calhoun Street 


$40,000 


6105 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


James Island High 
School Gym 


James Island, 
SC 




6106 


U.S. 
Government 


Post Office Annex 


North 
Charleston, SC 


$1,000,000 



117 



6107 


Francis Marion 
Hotel 


Garage 


King Street 




6108 


Francis Marion 
Hotel 


Renovation of Room 
1135 


King Street 




6109 


First National 
Bank 


Bank Building 


Summerville, SC 


$29,558 


6110 


Capt. And Mrs. 
H.K. Rock 


Home 


Jacksonville, FL 




6111 


Condon's 


Warehouse 


19 Warren Street 


$16,993 


6112 


? 


Proposed Pine Haven 
Expansion 


Charleston 




6113 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Four Classroom Addition 
James Island High 
School 


James Island, 
SC 




6114 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Two Classroom Addition 
Harborview Elementary 
School 


James Island, 
SC 


$16,400 


6115 


Charleston 
County 
Department of 


Alternate 4th Floor 


Charleston 


$28,657 




Mr. & Mrs. A. 
Constantine 


alterations to residence 


201 Grove Street 




1962 J 


6201 


Mr. And Mrs. A. 
Chrysoston 


Home 


125 St. Margaret 
Street 


$22,835 


6202 


U.S. 
Government 


Armory 


St. George, SC 


$135,824 


6203 


Dorchester- 
Waylyn Baptist 
Church 


Educational Building 
(revised drawings) 


Charleston 
Heights, SC 


$116,509 


6204 


Francis Marion 
Hotel 


Addition 


King Street 




6205 


Public Savings 
and Life 
Insurance 


District Office 


Sumter, SC 





118 



6206 


Mrs. Esther 
Miller 


Home 


Lambs Sub- 
Division North 
Charleston, SC 




6207 


Benevolent 
Society 


Hospital and Training 
School for Nurses 


Kingstree, SC 




6208 


Dr. S.G. 
Koutrouiakis 


Office Building 


Beaufort, SC 


$26,300 


6209 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Stiles Point "White" 
Elementary School 


James Island, 
SC 


$164,281 


6210 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


"Negro" Elementary 
School 


James Island, 
SC 


$160,996 


6211 


William 
Pearlman 


Pearlman Apartments 


San Souci Street 




6212 


? 


St. Stephens Municipal 
Building 


St. Stephens, SC 




6213 


Dorman's Oil 
Paint Service 


Building 


Charleston 




6214 


J.L. Pressman 


Proposed Development 


Folly Beach, SC 




6215 


? 


Greek Church 


Fayetteville, NC 


$119,600 


6216 


Rifle Club 


Building 


Ashley Park 
Charleston, SC 




6217 


? 


Auto Paint Shop 


Columbia, SC 




6218 


Research 
Foundation 


Additions and Alterations 
to Main Building 


Sapelo Island, 
GA 




6219 


Marion 


? 


Sullivan's Island, 
SC 






James Island 
School District 
#3 


11 Classroom elementary 
School 


James Island, 
SC 


$125,000 




Francis Marion 
Hotel 


Additions, Elevator 
Shafts, etc. 


King Street 


$50,000 



119 



1963 1 


6301 


[West] Pulp and 
Paper Company 


Office Building 


Summerville, SC 




6302 


? 


Pearlman Apartments 


San Souci Street 




6303 


Abraham's 
Furniture Co. 


Store Building 


Corner of King 
and John Streets 


unexecuted 


6304 


Dr. J. T. Hiott 


Apartment Building 


142 Wentworth 
Street 


unexecuted 


6305 


Beaufort School 
District 


Additions Mather School 


Beaufort, SC 




6306 


Berlin Brothers 


Store and Office Building 


King Street 




6307 


? 


Additions to Botzis 
Building 


Cleveland Street 




6308 


Debacker & 
Hottinger 


Store Building 


Corner of 
Rutledge & 
Calhoun 




6309 


Condon's 


Alterations, north 


431 King Street 




6310 


Mr. Castlebury 


Motel 


Valdosta, GA 




6311 


P.M. Clement 


? 


? 




6312 


Dr. Charles 
Banov 


Office Building 


Corner of 
Doughty Street 
and Ashley 


$31,992 


6313 


Pepsi-Cola 

Bottling 

Company 


Additions Pepsi Cola 
Bottling Co. Warehouse 


Charleston 




6314 


? 


Marina 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




6315 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Baptist Hill High School, 
Library Addition 


Hollywood, SC 


$20,000 



120 



6316 


Emanuel A. M. 
E. Church 


Additions and Alterations 


Calhoun Street 




6317 


U.S. 
Government 


Barracks Building 


Naval 

Ammunition 

Depot 


$250,000 


6318 


Francis Marion 
Hotel 


Parking Lot 


King Street 




6319 


Francis Marion 
Hotel 


Renovation of 12th floor 
for an apartment for 
General Mark Clark 


King Street 




6320 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Robert D. Schroder 
Elementary School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$219,978 


6321 


St. James - 
Santee School 
District #1 


Two Classroom Addition 
to Lincoln School 


Charleston 
County 


$30,353 


6322 


? 


Westover Inn 


Corner of Cherry 
and Bee Street 




6323 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Harborview Elementary, 
2 classroom addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$98,369 


6324 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Stiles Point Elementary 
School, 6 Classroom 
Addition, & Additions to 
Various Other Schools 


James Island, 
SC 


$150,000 


6325 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


James Island High 
School 4 classroom 
Addition 


James Island, 
SC 




6326 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


King's Hwy Elementary 
School (1 of many) 


James Island, 
SC 




6327 


Mr. T. Botzis 


Building 


? 






Mr. & Mrs. A. 
Constantine 


alterations to residence 


201 Grove Street 




1964 1 


6401 


? 


Orvin Apartments 


48 Bull Street 


1 



121 



6402 


Howard R. 
Chapman 


Office Building 


123 Meeting 
Street 




6403 


Fidelity Masons 


Lodge 


James Island, 
SC 




6404 


Morris Street 
Baptist Church 


Church building 


25-29 Morris 
Street 


$400,000 


6405 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Baptist Hill High School, 
3 Classroom Addition 


Hollywood, SC 


$28,000 


6406 


Berlin Brothers 


Office Building 


117-119 King 
Street 




6407 


Berkley Electric 
Cooperative 


Office Building 


Monck's Corner, 
SC 


$125,000 


6408 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Murray La Saine (Cut 
Bridge) Elementary 
School Addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$85,000 


6409 


Berkley Electric 
Cooperative 


Branch Building 


Highway 37 and 
Robert Road 




6410 


Abraham's 
Furniture Co. 


Store Building 


Corner of King 
and John Streets 


unexecuted 


6411 


? 


Auditorium 


Charleston 




6412 


J.C. Long 


"Big Bertha" Remodeling 


King Street 




6413 


Charleston 
County 


Police Head Quarters 


North 
Charleston, SC 




6414 


Sisters of 
Charity of Our 
Lady of Mercy 


Settlement House and 
Community Center 


America Street 




6415 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Gymnasiums for James 
Island & W. Gresham 
Meggett High Schools 


James Island, 
SC 


$300,000 


6416 


J.C. Long 


Addition 


Savannah, GA 





122 





Greek 
Community 


Church 


Fayetteville, NC 


$120,000 




Mr. & Mrs. A. 
Constantine 


alterations to residence 


201 Grove Street 




1965 1 


6501 


Church of the 

Hellenic 

Community 


Educational Building and 
Auditorium 


Winston-Salem, 
NC 




6502 


Van-Smith 
Building Material 
Company 


Office and Warehouse 


East Bay Street 


$200,000 


6503 


? 


Kings Shopping Center 


Fayetteville, NC 




6504 


St. Elpis Greek 

Orthodox 

Church 


Church 


Hopewell, VA 




6505 


Windsor Baptist 
Church 


Alterations and Additions 


North 
Charleston, SC 




6506 


Farmers and 
Merchants Bank 
of Holly Hill 


Bank Building 


Monck's Corner, 
SC 


$60,000 


6507 


St. George 

Hellenic 

Community 


Community and 
Educational Building 


Greenville, SC 




6508 


Rittenberg, 
Graham, and 
Seymour 


Office Building 


111 Meeting 
Street 




6509 


Irene B. 
Constantine 


Apartment Building 


Corner of 
Rutledge Avenue 
and Maverick 




6510 


Condon's 


Drive-In Restaurant 


? 


unexecuted 


6511 


Berlin Brothers 


Store building (Berlin's?) 


Corner of King 
and Broad 
Streets 


$100,000 


6512 


Mr. And Mrs. Pat 
Leonard 


Addition to Studio 


James Island, 
SC 





123 



6513 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Abe Thorny 


New Building for 
Calhoun's 


Sumter, SC 




6514 


Miriam Lem 


Laundry 


Charleston, SC 




6515 


[Szazay] 
Verones 


Office Building 


Aiken, SC 




6516 


Everett Smith 


Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. 
Warehouse & Office 


Charleston 


$170,000 


6517 


George Bazakas 


Professional Building 


Summerville, SC 




6518 


J.C. Long 


Parking Garage 


Savannah, GA 




6519 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


School Addition 


James Island, 
SC 


375,900 


6520 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


School Addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$24,800 


6521 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Stiles Point Elementary 
School, 6 Classroom 
Addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$74,300 


6522 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Office of the District 

Superintendent, 

Additions 


James Island, 
SC 




6523 


J.C. Long 


Office Building 


Savannah, GA 






Berkley Electric 
Cooperative 


Additions 


Monck's Corner, 
SC 




1966 1 


6601 


St. Paul's 
School District # 
23 


Additions to St. Paul's 
High School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 




6602 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Library Conversions 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$11,040 



124 



6603 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Additions to Baptist Hill 
Elementary School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 




6604 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


New Cafeteria for Baptist 
Hill Elementary School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 




6605 


St, Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Additions to Miley Hill 
Elementary School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 




6606 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Additions to Jane 
Edwards Elementary 
School 


Edisto Island, SC 




6607 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Additions to Minnie 
Hughes Elementary 
School 


James Island, 
SC 


not 
executed 


6608 


Hertz 


Proposed Trucking 
Station 


North 
Charleston, SC 




6609 


? 


Hawthorne Aviation 
Building 


Charleston 




6610 


Drs. Edwards 
and Brock 


Office Building 


4 Mendelson 
Street 




6611 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Library Conversions 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$11,040 


6612 


Dorchester- 
Waylyn Baptist 
church 


Educational Building 


North 
Charleston, SC 




6613 


Bethel Baptist 
Church 


Rehab of existing church 


Sumter, SC 


$72,342 


6614 


Miller Cadillac 
Company 


Building 


? 




6615 


Mr. Hamish 
Turner 


Renovation of 
Apartments 


36 Pitt street 


$18,348 


6616 


Renken Boat 
Co. 


Rehabilitation 


North 
Charleston, SC 


$25,000 


6617 


Dr. W.W. 
Vallotton 


Alterations to residence 


? 





125 



6618 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Charles W. 
Shealy 


Residence 


Younge's Island, 
SC 




6619 


Mr. George B. 
Bishop 


Alterations and Additions 
to Building 


Monck's Corner, 
SC 




6620 


Beaufort Baptist 
Church 


Additions 


Beaufort, SC 


$3,000 


6621 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Baptist Hill High School, 
Additions 


Hollywood, SC 


$75,000 


6622 


Angus Steak 
House 


New Building 


Savannah Hwy 




6623 


J.C. Long 


Parking garage for 
Downtown Motel 


Charleston 




6624 


McClellanville 
School District 
#1 


Alterations and Additions 
to Lincoln High and 
Elementary Schools 


McClellanville, 
SC 




6625 


Palace Realty 
Company 


Proposed Development 


Charleston 




6626 


Nemouxs 
Plantation 


Pool House 


Yemassee, SC 




6627 


Coastal States 


Office Building 


Northwest 
Corner of King 
and Congress 


$61,185 


6628 


Palmetto 

Construction 

Company 


Wholesale Building 


? 




6629 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


4 Classroom addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$30,000 


6630 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


4 Classroom addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$30,000 


6631 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


4 Classroom addition 


James Island, 
SC 


$30,000 


1967 1 


6701 


J.C. Long 


Proposed Five Story 
Building 


Charleston 





126 



6702 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Proposed Vocational 
Building Gresham 
Meggett School 


James Island, 
SC 




6703 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Music Building James 
Island High School 


James Island, 
SC 




6704 


Mr. Combs 


Residence 


Charleston 




6705 


Mr. and Mrs. 
Edwin L. Happ 


Residence 


Aiken, SC 




6706 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Everett Smith 


Residence 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




6707 


J.C. Coag 


Paul Motor Company 
Building 


Charleston 




6708 


John's Island 
School District 
#9 


Haupt Gap School 
Alterations 


John's Island, SC 




6709 


John's Island 
School District 
#9 


John's Island High and 
Elementary School Gym 
and classroom building 


John's Island, SC 


$350,000 


6710 


John's Island 
School District 
#9 


Haupt Gap High and 
Elementary School Gym 


John's Island, SC 


$270,000 


6711 


Condon's 


Eating Facilities for 
Condon's 


431 King Street 




6712 


Bethel 

Presbyterian 

Church 


Church building 


Walterboro, SC 


$125,000 


6713 


J.C. Long 


12 Unit Apartment 
Building 


Charleston 




6714 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Robert Schroder School, 
Library Addition 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$35,000 


6715 


Windsor Baptist 
Church 


Proposed Church Facility 


Ashley 
Phosphate Road 




6716 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Miley Hill Elem. School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 





127 



6717 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Addition to St. Paul's 
High School Gym 


Younge's Island, 
SC 




6718 


St, Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Minnie Hughes 
Elementary School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 




6719 


McClellanville 
School District 
#1 


Remodeling of Kitchen 
and Gym Lincoln School 


McClellanville, 
SC 


$35,000 


6720 


Charleston 
County Police 
Department 


Addition to Police Station 


? 




6721 


Windsor Baptist 
Church 


Church and Educational 
Facilities 


Ashley 
Phosphate Road 




6722 


J. P. [Liaghorse] 


Shopping Center 


? 




6723 


Mr. Milton 
Schwartz 


Residence Remodeling 


1054 Keats 
Street 




6724 


Nicholas Sottile 


Apartments, Cluster Type 


? 




6725 


Abraham's 
Furniture Co. 


Store Building 


Corner of King 
and John Streets 




6726 


St. Paul's 
School District 
#23 


Library Addition Robert 
Schroder School 


Younge's Island, 
SC 


$35,000 


6727 


Hibben 

Methodist 

Church 


Church 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




1968 1 


6801 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Store Room W. Gresham 
Meggett School 


James Island, 
SC 




6802 


Charleston 

Police 

Department 


Sub-Station # 1 


James Island, 
SC 




6803 


Charleston 

Police 

Department 


Sub-Station #2 and 3 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 





128 



6804 


First Baptist 
Church 


? 






6805 


John's Island 
School District 
#9 


Haupt Gap High and 
Elementary School Shop 
building 


John's Island, SC 


$35,000 


6806 


St. Andrew's 
School District 


St. Andrew's Shop 
Building 


St. Andrew's, SC 


$35,000 


6807 


Ed Stehmeyer 


Office Building 


? 




6808 


John's Island 
School District 
#9 


Gym John's Island 
School 


John's Island, SC 




6809 


John's Island 
School District 
#9 


John's Island High and 
Elementary School Shop 
building 


John's Island, SC 


$35,000 


6810 


John's Island 
School District 
#9 


Haupt Gap High Gym 


John's Island, SC 




6811 


St. Matthew's 
Church 


? 


? 




6812 


Tibwin 
Community 


Development Club 
Recreation Association 
Building 


? 




6813 


Newland 

Development 

Company 


Dorchester Gardens 
Apartments 


North 
Charleston, SC 




6814 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Music and Shop 
Buildings Fort Johnson 
High School 


James Island, 
SC 


$107,000 


1969 1 


6901 


J.C. Long 


Office Building 


Savannah, GA 


$650,000 


6902 


? 


Craft School 
Rehabilitation 


? 




6903 


Dr. Paul 
Buc[hanan] and 
Dr. Ray Hayes 


Office Building and 
Shops 


? 




6904 


Greek Church 


Building 


Fayetteville, NC 




6905 


James Island 
School Distnct 
#3 


Changes to Gresham 
Meggett School 


James Island, 
SC 


$90,000 



129 



6906 


Charleston 
County School 
District 


Conversion of Existing 
Building to Maintenance 
Building 


Charleston 


$75,000 


6907 


J.C. Long 


Ashley Theatre 


Charleston 




6908 


J.C. Long 


Mt. Pleasant Theatre 


Mt. Pleasant, SC 




6909 


Greek 
Community 


Church, School and Hall 


Raleigh, NC 


$300,000 


6910 


? 


Conversion of Wallace 
School 


7 


$75,000 


6911 


St. James- 
Santee School 
District #1 


Rehab of existing 
cafeteria building 


McClellanville, 
SC 


$10,000 


6912 


Margiotta 
Sewing Machine 
Company 


Addition 


? 






Mr. & Mrs. A. 
Constantine 


alterations to residence 


201 Grove Street 




1970 1 


7001 


Charleston 
County Welfare 
Department 


Renovations 


Charleston 
County 


$60,000 


7002 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Edwin H. 
Poulnot, Jr 


Rehabilitation of Beach 
House 


Sullivan's Island, 
SC 




7003 


? 


Proposed Hotel 


Aiken, SC 




7004 


? 


Proposed Typical Pre- 
Vocational Buildings for 
Elementary and High 
Schools 






7005 


Newland 

Development 

Company 


Highland Garden 
Apartments, Community 
Building and Pool 


Charleston, SC 


$12,500 


7006 


Charleston 
County School 
District 


Middleton High School 
Shop Alterations 


St. Andrews 

Parish, 

Charleston 


$37,332 



130 



7007 


Perkins 
Pancake House 


? 


? 




7008 


Dr. [M] Cord 


Kitchen 


? 




7008 


Charleston 
County 


Charleston County Police 
H.Q. Annex addition and 
renovations 


North 
Charleston, SC 


3112,384 


7009 


Georgia N. 
Palassis 


Palassis Apartments 


North 
Charleston, SC 


$250,000 


7010 


Dr. J. Hampton 
Hoch 


Residence 


John's Island, SC 


$30,000 


7011 


Mr. James 
Mitchell 


Beach House 


Edisto Beach 




7012 


Charleston 
County School 
District 


Sullivan's Island 
Academy, 2 classroom 
addition 


Sullivan's Island, 
SC 


$21,450 


7013 


Dr. Dan L. 
Maguire, Jr 


Office 


? 




7014 


G.N. Palassis 
and P. Banis 


Siesta Motel, 24 unit 
addition 


North 
Charleston, SC 


$153,406 


7015 


Emanuel Baptist 
Church 


? 


Summerville, SC 




1971 1 


7100 


Francis Marion 
Hotel 


Garage 


King Street 




7101 


Mr. Ginesberg 


Building 


Spruill Avenue 




7102 


Charleston Air 
Force Base 


742nd Radar Squadron 
Entrance Additions 


North 
Charleston, SC 




7103 


Ducker and 
Kennedy 


Renovation of Exterior of 
Prescription Center 


Corner of 
Rutledge and 
Bull Streets 





131 



7104 


James Island 
School District 
#3 


Bathroom Facilities for 
St. John's Elementary 
and High School and 
Stiles Point Elementary 
School 


James Island, 
SC 




7105 


Charleston 
County School 
District 


Lincoln School Gym 


McClellanville, 
SC 


$342,933 


7106 


J.C. Long 


Castle Building 


Savannah, GA 


$650,000 


7107 


? Spur 


Residence 






7108 


Calvary A. M. E. 
Church 


? 


Union Heights, 
SC 




7109 


Dr. D.L 
Maguire, Sr. 


Office 


145 Wentworth 
Street 




7110 


St. James 

United 

Presbyterian 


Church building 


James Island, 
SC 


$400,000 


7111 


Gallitte Church 
of Christ 


? 


Edisto Beach, 
SC 




7112 


Morris Sokol 
Furniture 


Warehouse 


Charleston 




1972 1 


7201 


College of 
Charleston 


Learning Resources 
Center 


Charleston 


$225,000 


7202 


Dr. And Mrs. 
Charles Darby, 
Jr. 


Home 


Seaside Farms 


$100,000 


7203 


Mr. And Mrs. 
Ray Ball 


Duplex Apartments 


James Island, 
SC 


$20,000 


7204 


Sea Island 
Academy 


12 classroom school 


John's Island, SC 


$132,000 


7205 


Loudy Mountain 
Baptist Church 


? 


North 
Charleston, SC 





132 



7205 


[Railing's] 


Greek Church 


Charleston 




7206 


Karen 

Martschink 

Distributing 


? 


Beaufort, SC 




7207 


D.J. Stroble 


1-95 trucking station 


1-95 


$124,880 


7208 


D. J. Stroble 


Addition to Buildings 


Summerville, SC 




7209 


St. Mark's 
Lutheran Church 


Church building 


Isle of Palms, SC 


$125,000 


7210 


Masonic Lodge? 


Masonic Building Project 


Charleston 




7211 


Burke High 
School 


Storage Building 


207 President 
Street 


$9,873 


7212 


Food Services 
Supply, inc. 


Facade 


Charleston 




7213 


Social Security 
Administration 


Building 


Beaufort, SC 




7214 


J. C. Long 


"Big Bertha" Apartments 
[remodeling or 
alterations] 


1050-1054 King 
Street 




7215 


Dr. Vailottons 


Alterations to Residence 


Charleston 




7216 


Charleston Arms 
Apartments 


Office Building 


North Charleston 




7217 


Welfare 
Department 


Alterations (The Center) 


Charleston? 




7218 


J. C. Long 


? For the Francis Marion 
Hotel 


King Street 




1973 1 


7301 


City of 
Charleston 


Gymnasium 


Corner of 
Hagood and 
Fishburne 


$384,498 



133 



7302 


Hugh Wilson 


Residence 


McClellanville, 
SC 


$28,355 


7303 


Gifford-Hill Inc. 


Cement Plant 


Harleyville, SC 


$500,000 


7303 


Fred Norris & 
Roy Varner 


Motel and Restaurant 
facilities 


Eutawville, SC 


$150,000 


7304 


Charleston Air 
Force Base 


Officers' Open Mess 
Club, alterations 


Charleston Air 
Force Base 


$70,000 


7305 


Bethel 

Presbyterian 

Church 


Educational Facilities 


Walterboro, SC 


$125,000 


7306 


Jackson 
Opticians 


? 


Charleston 




7307 


Lonne Hamilton, 
IV 


Additions to House 


Charleston? 




7308 


Charleston 
County 


Cooper River Memorial 
Library, Additions 


Charleston 




7309 


Burke School 


Cafeteria and Kitchen 


207 President 
Street 


$251,474 


7310 


Charleston 
County 


Renovations 


133 Calhoun 
Street 


$147,267 


7311 


College of 
Charleston 


[illegible] 


Charleston 




7312 


Dr. & Mrs. R.R. 
Bradham 


kitchen renovation 


Murray Blvd. 


$12,500 


7313 


College of 
Charleston 


Fine Arts Building 


Charleston 




7314 


Mr. And Mrs. D. 
Montgomery 


Home 


Watkinsville, GA 




7315 


Greater St. 
James Bethel 
Methodist 


Additions 


Wadmalaw 
Island, SC 





134 



7316 


College of 
Charleston 


Lesesne House, guest 
house rehab. 


Charleston 


$30,000 


7317 


Mr. Elliott 
Constantine 


Home 


Folly Beach, SC 




7318 


Citadel Square 
Baptist Church 


Additions 


Meeting Street 




7319 


? 


Renovation of Courtyard 
Center Building 


? 




7320 


City of 
Charleston 


Fire Station 


Charleston 




7321 


City of 
Charleston 


Fire Station #10 


Nicholson & U.S. 
Hwy 17 


$117,524 


7322 


City of 
Charleston 


Portable Fire Station 


Charleston 




7323 


Citadel Square 
Baptist Church 


Thomas A. Brookbanks 
Memorial 


Meeting Street 


$8,500 


7324 


Citadel Square 
Baptist Church 


Rehabilitation of Music 
Room 


Meeting Street 




7325 


Mr. And Mrs. 
James Randall 
[Davis?] 


Residence 


Monck's Corner, 
SC 




7326 


Welfare 
Department 


Renovations 


Charleston 


$25,000 


7327 


First National 
Bank of Holly 
Hill 


? 


Summerville, SC 




7328 


Jack White 


[illegible] 


Charleston? 




7328 


John Reynolds, 
MD 


Cottage Plantation 


Charleston? 




1974 1 


7401 


Charleston 
County Welfare 
Department 


Day Care Renovations 


Charleston 





135 



7402 


City of 
Charleston 


Recreation Building 


Charleston 


$21,184 


7403 


Ashley River 
Baptist Church 


? 


Charleston 




7404 


R. R. Bradham 


Town Houses 


Short Street 


$12,000 


7405 


J. C. Long 


High Rise Building 


? 




7406 


Department of 
Social Services 


Cubicle for Bill Knowles 


? 


$2,000 


7407 


Dr. W. W. 
Vaiiotton 


? 


St. Paul's Parish, 
SC 




7408 


Mr. Crawford 


Cemetery Lot Lay-out at 
Bethany Cemetery 


Charleston 




7409 


Jeffries, 

McLeod, Unger, 
Fraser 


Office Renovations 


Walterboro, SC 




7411 


College of 
Charleston 


College Inn, Renovations 


Calhoun Street '? 


$26,143 


7412 


College of 
Charleston 


Craig Hall Renovation 


Wentworth 
Street 


$18,363 


7413 


College of 
Charleston 


Toilet Changes 


Charleston 




7414 


Charleston 
County Masonic 
Temple 


Masonic Temple 


Grove Street 


$1,200,000 


7415 


College of 
Charleston 


College Lodge 


Calhoun Street 




7416 


College of 
Charleston 


Renovations to J. C. 
Long Building 


Liberty and St. 
Philip Streets 




7417 


City of 
Charleston 


Tennis Center and Club 
House 


Charleston 


$161,802 



136 



7418 


College of 
Charleston 


College Inn ? 


Calhoun Street? 




7419 


Gus Martschink 


Warehouse and Office 
Space 


Charleston 




1975 1 


7501 


Bill Leiand 


Archibald Rutledge 
Private School 


McClellanville, 
SC 


3100,000 


7502 


Courtenay 
School 


Renovations 


Meeting Street 




7503 


Charleston 
County 


Food Stamp Center 
Renovations 


Charleston 
County 


$15,639 


7504 


Stallsville United 

Methodist 

Church 


Educational Building 


Summerville, SC 


$138,000 


7505 


Mr. K. D. 
Hondros 


Proposed Development 


Fayetteville, NC 




7506 


College of 
Charleston 


Renovations 


97 Wentworth 
Street 


$83,380 


7507 


College of 
Charleston 


Renovations 


107 Wentw/orth 
Street 


$88,584 


7508 


College of 
Charleston 


Mobile Dormitory Units 


Charleston 




7509 


College of 
Charleston 


Dormitories 


Charleston 




7510 


Citadel 


Transformer 
Replacement 


Charleston 


$23,670 


7511 


Citadel 


Padgett-Thomas, 268 
Rooms 


Charleston 


$664,970 


7512 


College of 
Charleston 


Mobile Dormitory Units 


Charleston 




7513 


College of 
Charleston 


Dormitory 


Wentworth and 
Coming Street 





137 



7514 


Citadel 


Barracks #2, new service, 
panels, feeders 


Charleston 


$23,850 


7515 


College of 
Charleston 


New Brick Fence, 
College Inn 


Calhoun Street? 




7516 


Dr. Vallottons 


Lake House 


? 




7517 


George Lagare 
Homes 


Tenants' Assistance Day 
Care 


? 




7518 


Bethel 

Presbyterian 

Church 


Douglas Hall, 
Renovations 


Walterboro, SC 


$115,000 


7519 


? 


? 


Burns Lane 




7520 


Greater Zion A. 
M. E. Church 


? 


? 




7521 


River Road Day 
Care Center 


? 


River Road 




7522 


Peter's Field 
Day Care 
Center 


? 


? 




7523 


? 


Recreation Center 


? 




1976 


7601 


Baker and 
Palassis 


Apartments 


Suquoia Street 




7602 


College of 
Charleston 


Renovations 


15 St. Philip 
Street 


$88,524 


7603 


College of 
Charleston 


Renovations 


17 St. Philip 
Street 


$90,052 


7604 


Leventiss 
Property 


? 


Calhoun Street 
and Burns Lane 




7605 


D. E. Palassis 
Apartments 


? 


Aberdeen 
Avenue 





138 



7606 


City of North 
Charleston 


Dorchester Fire Station 


North 
Charleston, SC 


$171,869 


7607 


Clyde Burris 


Liquor Store 


Charleston 




7608 


W.W. Vallotton, 
Doctor 


Replace Residence 


Folly Beach, SC 


$33,000 


7609 


Jackson- 
Davenport 


Parking Lot 


Charleston 




7610 


Bullwinkie 
Mobile Homes 
and Park 


? 


? 




7611 


Citadel 


Padgett-Thomas 
Barracks #2, renovation 


Charleston 


$664,970 


7612 


First National 
Bank of Holly 
Hill 


Additions & Renovations 


Summerville, SC 


$120,000 


7613 


? 


14 Apartment Units 


Calhoun Street 




7614 


Zion Temple 
Association 


? 


John's Island 




7615 


First Baptist 
Church 


Memorial Tablet 


? 




7616 


Citadel 


Law Barracks #3, 
Transformer 
Replacement, new 
service panels and 
feeders, telephone 
raceways 


Charleston 


$30,924 


7617 


Citadel 


Stevens Barracks #4, 
Transformer 
Replacement, new 
service panels and 
feeders, telephone 
raceways 


Charleston 


$29,164 


7618 

& 

7619 


Citadel 


Law Barracks #3 and 
Stevens Barracks #4, 
renovations 


Charleston 


$544,700 



139 



APPENDIX D: IMAGES 



140 




Figure D.l Marion Square Bandstand 
(1944, demolished 3/2000) 

Photographed by author 




Figure D.2 Cowpertliwaite Building, 209-213 King Street 
(1946) Approved for demolition on 3/17/00 

Photographed by author 



141 




Figure D.3 Health, Education, and Welfare Office Building, 
Atlanta, GA (1939) 

Courtesy of Constantine and Constantine Architects. Date of 
photograph unknown. 




Figure D.4 J. C. Long Residence, Mt. Pleasant (1948) 

Courtesy of Constantine and Constantine Architects. Date of 
Photograph unknown 



142 




^ili iLM 





- 1( 





Figure D.5 Condon's Department Store, rendering, 431 King Street 
(1946, 1947 with multiple campaigns) 

Courtesy of Constantine and Constantine Architects. 




Figure D.6 McClennan Banks Memorial Hospital, rendering, Courtenay 

Drive (1956) 

Courtesy of Constantine and Constantine Architects. 



143 




Figure D.7 Haverty's Furniture Store, 294 King Street 
Now Dumas (1942) 

Photographed by author 




Figure D.8 Van Smith Building Materials, 276 East Bay Street 
(1949) Now Anchor Bank 

Photographed by author 



144 




Figure D-9 Martschink Building, 26 Cumberland Street (1944) 

Photographed by author 




Figure D-10 309 King Street, date unknown 

Photographed by author 



145 




Figure D.ll Charleston County Hall, 1000 King Street (1953) Now King 

Street Palace 

Photographed by author 





Figure D,12 Marilyn's Shoe Store, 299 King Street (1945) 

Photographed by author 



146 




Figure D.13 McAlister's Mortuary, rendering (1953) 
163 Meeting Street 

Courtesy of Constantine and Constantine Architects 




Figure D.14 McAlister's Mortuary (1956) 

150 Wentworth Street 

Courtesy of Constantine and Constantine Architects 



147 




Figure D.15 Morris Street Baptist Church, 25-29 Morris 
Street (1964) 

Photographed bv author 




Figure D.16 Blessed Sacrament Church, U.S. Highway 17 (1950) 

Photographed by author 



148 



APPENDIX E: SAMPLING OF BOOKS FROM 
CONSTANTINE'S OFFICE 



149 



List of Books 

Abel, Joseph H. and Fred N. Severud. Apartment Houses. New York: Reinhold 
Publishing Corporation, 1947. 

American Face Brick Association, The. English Precedent for Modern Brichvork: 

Plates and Measured Drawings of English Tudor and Georgian Brickwork, with a 
Few Recent Versions By American Architects in the Spirit of the Old Work. New 
York; The Architectural Forum, 1924. 

Birkmire, William H. The Planning and Construction of High Office Buildings. New 
York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1898. 

Burris-Meyer, Harold and Edward C. Cole. Theatres and Auditoriums. New York: 
Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 1949. 

Creighton, Thomas, et. al. Homes: Selected by the Editors of Progressive Architecture . 
New York: Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 1947. 

Fischer and Jirouch, Company, The. Interior and Exterior Decorative Ornament: 
Catalogue # 12. Cleveland: The Fischer and Jirouch Company, 1931. 

General Electric Company. Hospital Handbook for Architects and Engineers. New 
York: General Electric Company, 1949. 

Holdt, H. Picturesque Greece: Architecture, Landscape, Life of the People Berlin: 
Ernst Wasmuth, LTD, 1928. 

Kelly, J. Frederick. Early Connecticut Architecture: Measured Drawings with Full Size 
Details of Moulded Sections Supplemented by Photogixiphs. New York: William 
Helburn, Inc., 1924. 

Knobloch, Philip G. Good Practice in Construction. New York: The Pencil Points Press, 
Inc., 1923. 

McGoodwin, Henry. Architectural Shades and Shadows Boston: Bates and Guild 
Company, 1904. 

Olsen, Peter C. Architectural Terra Cotta: Standard Construction New York; National 
Terra Cotta Society, 1914. 

Ramsey, Charles George, and Harold Reeve Sleeper. Architectural Graphic Standards. 
New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1957. 



150 



Rosenfield, Isadore. Hospitals: Integrated Desig?!. New York: Reinhold Publishing 
Corporation, 1947. 

Sexton, R.W. The Logic of Modern Architecture: The Desigfi of Exteriors and Interiors 
of Modern American Buildings. New York: Architectural Book Publishing 
Company, 1929. 

Sherman, David E., and Richard Wilcox. Literary England: Photographs of Places 
Made Memorable in EngUsh Literature. New York: Random House, 1944. 

Sleeper, Harold Reeve. Architectural Specifications. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 
Inc., 1940. 

Smith, J. Frazier. Wliite Pillars: Early Life and Architecture of the Lower Mississippi 
Valley. New York: William Helburn, Inc , 1941 

Speltz, Alexander. Styles of Ornaments. New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1952 

Stoney, Samuel Gaillard. Plantations of the Carolina Low Country. Charleston: The 
Carolina Art Association, 1939. 

Wallace, Philip B. Colonial Houses: Philadelphia Pre-Revolutionary Period. New 
York: Architectural Book Publishing Company, 193 1. 

. Colonial Ironwork of Old Philadelphia: The Craftsmanship of the Early Days of 

the Republic. New York: Architectural Book Publishing Company, 1930 

Waterman, Thomas Tileston. The Mansions of Virginia. 1706-1776. Chapel Hill: 
University of North Carolina Press, 1945. 

Weiss, Egon. The Design of Lettering. New York: The Pencil Points Press, Inc., 1932. 

Wills, Royal Barry. The Business of Architecture. New York: Architectural Book 
Publishing Company, 1941. 

. Houses for Good Living. New York: Architectural Book Publishing 

Company, 1940. 

Zucker, Paul, Ed. New Architecture and City Planning. New York: Philosophical 
Library, Inc., 1944. 



151 



Index 



A.I.A., 20, 22, 24 

Academy, 31, 32 

American Academy in Rome, 3 1 

American Theatre, 18, 20, 45 

apartment, 3, 10, 18, 20, 53, 55 

Arcade Theatre, 18, 45, 46, 47 

ArtDeco, 1, 2, 9, 15, 19, 21, 28, 35, 36, 
37, 38, 39, 40, 44, 45, 55, 56, 57 

BAR, 2, 4, 6, 7, 12 

Board, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13 

Board of Architectural Review, 2, 4, 6, 
8, 10, 11 

Botzis, 16, 42 

Broad Street, 4, 1 1 

Burke Industrial School, 50, 51 

Carolina Art Association, 4, 24 

Carrara, 40 

Caulkis, Greece, 16 

Charleston, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 
11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19,20,21, 
22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 31, 33, 36, 
39, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 48, 49, 52, 55, 
56, 57 

Chase Furniture, 20, 39, 40, 44, 45 

Chicco Apartments, 53, 54 

churches, 3, 20, 47 

Citadel Alumni House, 33, 53 

Citizens and Southern National Bank, 
39,43 

Classical, 1, 9, 15, 19, 23, 30, 32, 49, 54, 
55 

College of Charleston, 22 

Colonial Revival, 2, 11, 52 

Constantine, 1, 2, 3, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 
17, 18, 19,20,21,28,29,30, 31, 32, 
33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 
43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 52, 53, 
54, 55, 56, 57 

Courtenay School, 49 

Cowperthwaite Building, 2 

Cummings, 26, 28 

Dock Street Theatre, 25 

earthquake, 5 



Ebenezer A. M E Church, 47 

Ecole des Beaux Arts, 31,32 

Ellington, 21,23, 24,25,26 

fire. 5. 11 

Frampton,, 18 

Georgia School of Technology, 14, 30 

German Artillery Hall, 1 1 

Gloria Theatre, 18, 35 

Halsey, 1, 21, 26, 27 

Halsey & Cummings, 2 1 

Halsey and Cummings, 1, 26, 27 

Hentz, Adler, and Shutze Architects, 14, 

15 
historic district, 1 
Home Use Program, 53 
International Correspondence School, 

13, 14,35 
International style, 1, 19, 36, 37 
J. J Goodrum house, 33 
King Street, 2, 3, 10, 18, 20, 27, 33, 39, 

43,45, 55 
Kiwanis Club, 19 
Kronsberg, 52, 53 
Liollio, 17, 18, 19,20,49, 50, 51 
Lowndes Grove Plantation, 22 
Marilyn Shoes, 44 

Marion Square Bandstand, 2, 10, 20, 48 
McAlister's Mortuary, 55 
McCrady,, 27, 28 
McKim,, 3 1 

McKim, Meade, and White, 3 1 
Mies van der Rohe, 55 
Mitchell, 22, 24 
Moderne, 1, 9, 15, 19, 21, 28, 35, 37, 38 

40,41,42,44,46, 55, 56, 57 
Morris Street Baptist Church, 47, 49 
National Housing Agency, 53 
National Planning Conference, 24 
National Register of Historic Places, 9 
Old and Historic District, 4, 6, 10, 22, 

35,45 
Old City District, 4, 10 
Orders, 15, 30 



152 



ordinance, 1, 2, 4, 10, 11 

Perkins and Will, Inc, 50 

Powers, 17, 18, 19, 20, 34,49 

Queen Anne, 12, 29 

Randolph Hall, 23 

Reynolds, 16 

Riviera, 2, 18,45 

Robert Mills, 23 

Rome Prize, 3 1 

school, 14, 19, 20, 27, 28, 31, 49, 50, 51, 

52,55 
Shutze, 14, 15, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 
Simons, 1, 6, 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28 
Simons and Lapham, 1, 7, 21, 22, 23, 25, 

28 
Society for Preservation of Old 

Dwellings, 24 
Sottile, 12, 18, 35, 40, 44 
South Carolina Historical Society, 24 
St. Luke's A. M. E. Church, 49 
St. Michael's Episcopal Church, 22 
St. Philip Street Shops, 39, 40, 44 
Streamline Moderne, 38 
student drawings, 30 
Stuhr's Funeral Home, 1 1 
Techwood Homes, 24 
theaters, 3, 18,20, 35,37,44 
Van Smith Building Materials Company, 

49 
Vitrolite, 40, 46 

Wentworth Realty Company, 18, 40 
Wilson-Sottile House, 12 
World War I, 4, 5,31 
wrought iron, 34, 35, 37, 40, 41, 43, 47, 

53 



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